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Pancreas Transplantation from Hepatitis C Viremic Donors to Uninfected Recipients

Lonze, Bonnie E; Baptiste, Gillian; Ali, Nicole M; Dagher, Nabil N; Gelb, Bruce E; Mattoo, Aprajita; Soomro, Irfana; Tatapudi, Vashista S; Montgomery, Robert A; Stewart, Zoe A
Despite utilization of hepatitis C viremic organs for hepatitis C naïve recipients (HCV D+/R-) in other solid organ transplants, HCV viremic pancreata remain an unexplored source of donor organs. This study reports the first series of HCV D+/R- pancreas transplants. HCV D+/R- had shorter wait list times compared to HCV D-/R-, waiting a mean of 16 days from listing for HCV positive organs. HCV D+/R- had a lower match allocation sequence than HCV D-/R-, and this correlated to receipt of organs with a lower Pancreas Donor Risk Index (PDRI) score. All HCV D+R- had excellent graft function with a mean follow up of 438 days and had undetectable HCV RNA levels by a mean of 23 days after initiation of HCV-directed therapy. The rates of infectious complications, re-operation, readmission, rejection, and length of stay were not impacted by donor HCV status. A national review of potential ideal pancreas donors found that 37% of ideal HCV negative pancreas allografts were transplanted, compared to only 5% of ideal HCV positive pancreas allografts. The results of the current study demonstrate the safety of accepting HCV positive pancreata for HCV naïve recipients and advocates for increased utilization of ideal HCV positive pancreas allografts.
PMID: 33346951
ISSN: 1600-6143
CID: 4726692

Mild Clinical Course of COVID-19 in 3 Patients Receiving Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting C5 Complement for Hematologic Disorders

Araten, David J; Belmont, H Michael; Schaefer-Cutillo, Julia; Iyengar, Arjun; Mattoo, Aprajita; Reddy, Ramachandra
BACKGROUND Patients receiving immunosuppressive therapies might be more susceptible to COVID-19. Conversely, an exaggerated inflammatory response to the SARS-CoV-2 infection might be blunted by certain forms of immunosuppression, which could be protective. Indeed, there are data from animal models demonstrating that complement may be a part of the pathophysiology of coronavirus infections. There is also evidence from an autopsy series demonstrating complement deposition in the lungs of patients with COVID-19. This raises the question of whether patients on anti-complement therapy could be protected from COVID-19. CASE REPORT Case 1 is a 39-year-old woman with an approximately 20-year history of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), who had recently been switched from treatment with eculizumab to ravulizumab prior to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Case 2 is a 54-year-old woman with a cadaveric renal transplant for lupus nephritis, complicated by thrombotic microangiopathy, who was maintained on eculizumab, which she started several months before she developed the SARS-CoV-2 infection. Case 3 is a 60-year-old woman with a 14-year history of PNH, who had been treated with eculizumab since 2012, and was diagnosed with COVID-19 at the time of her scheduled infusion. All 3 patients had a relatively mild course of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS We see no evidence of increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 in these patients on anti-complement therapy, which might actually have accounted for the mild course of infection. The effect of anti-complement therapy on COVID-19 disease needs to be determined in clinical trials.
PMID: 32917848
ISSN: 1941-5923
CID: 4592232

Diet Quality Assessed via the Healthy Eating Index – 2010 among Overweight/Obese Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes and Concurrent Chronic Kidney Disease...2017 Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo, 2017, Chicago, IL, 21–24 October 2017

Woolf, K; Ganguzza, L; Pompeii, ML; Hu, L; St-Jules, DE; Jagannathan, R; Sierra, A; Goldfarb, DS; Katz, S; Mattoo, A; Li, H; Sevick, MA
CINAHL:124776855
ISSN: 2212-2672
CID: 2735092