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Faster B-cell repletion after anti-CD20 infusion in Black patients compared to white patients with neurologic diseases [Letter]

Saidenberg, Lucia; Arbini, Arnaldo A; Silverman, Gregg J; Lotan, Itay; Cutter, Gary; Kister, Ilya
This retrospective, single-center study aimed to characterize and compare the kinetics of B-cell reemergence following anti-CD20 infusion (anti-CD20i) in African American (AA) and white patients with MS or NMOSD. In a logistic regression model that included race, time since anti-CD20i, body mass index, and diagnosis, only AA race (p=0.01) and time since anti-CD20i (p=0.0003) were significant predictors of B-cell repletion. However, B-cell subset composition was similar between AA and white patients with detectable CD19+ B-cell counts. These findings highlight the importance of including a diverse study population in future studies of anti-CD20 therapies.
PMID: 35490448
ISSN: 2211-0356
CID: 5215682

EMSY inhibits homologous recombination repair and the interferon response, promoting lung cancer immune evasion

Marzio, Antonio; Kurz, Emma; Sahni, Jennifer M; Di Feo, Giuseppe; Puccini, Joseph; Jiang, Shaowen; Hirsch, Carolina Alcantara; Arbini, Arnaldo A; Wu, Warren L; Pass, Harvey I; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Pagano, Michele
Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harboring KEAP1 mutations are often resistant to immunotherapy. Here, we show that KEAP1 targets EMSY for ubiquitin-mediated degradation to regulate homologous recombination repair (HRR) and anti-tumor immunity. Loss of KEAP1 in NSCLC induces stabilization of EMSY, producing a BRCAness phenotype, i.e., HRR defects and sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Defective HRR contributes to a high tumor mutational burden that, in turn, is expected to prompt an innate immune response. Notably, EMSY accumulation suppresses the type I interferon response and impairs innate immune signaling, fostering cancer immune evasion. Activation of the type I interferon response in the tumor microenvironment using a STING agonist results in the engagement of innate and adaptive immune signaling and impairs the growth of KEAP1-mutant tumors. Our results suggest that targeting PARP and STING pathways, individually or in combination, represents a therapeutic strategy in NSCLC patients harboring alterations in KEAP1.
PMID: 34963055
ISSN: 1097-4172
CID: 5108142

Improving prognostic assignment in older adults with multiple myeloma using acquired genetic features, clonal hemopoiesis and telomere length

Boyle, Eileen M; Williams, Louis; Blaney, Patrick; Ashby, Cody; Bauer, Michael; Walker, Brian A; Ghamlouch, Hussein; Choi, Jinyoung; Perrial, Emeline; Wang, Yubao; Caro, Jessica; Stoeckle, James H; Arbini, Arnaldo; Kaminetzky, David; Braunstein, Marc; Bruno, Benedetto; Razzo, Beatrice; Diamond, Benjamin; Maclachlan, Kylee; Maura, Francesco; Landgren, Ola; Litke, Rachel; Fegan, Christopher D; Keats, Johnathan; Auclair, Daniel; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J
PMID: 34148053
ISSN: 1476-5551
CID: 4918002

Multiomic Mapping of Copy Number and Structural Variation on Chromosome 1 (Chr1) Highlights Multiple Recurrent Disease Drivers [Meeting Abstract]

Blaney, P; Boyle, E M; Wang, Y; Ghamlouch, H; Choi, J; Williams, L; James, S; Siegel, A; Razzo, B; Braunstein, M; Kaminetzky, D; Arbini, A A; Bruno, B; Corre, J; Montes, L; Auclair, D; Davies, F E; Tsirigos, A; Rustad, E H; Maura, F; Landgren, O; Bauer, M A; Walker, B; Morgan, G
Introduction Copy number abnormalities (CNA) and structural variants (SV) are crucial to driving cancer progression and in multiple myeloma (MM). Chr1 CNA are seen in up to 40% of cases and associate with poor prognosis. Variants include deletions, gains, translocations and complex SV events such as chromothripsis (CT), chromoplexy (CP) and templated insertions (TI) which result in aberrant transcriptional patterns. Abnormal expression of genes on chr1 lead to the adverse clinical outcome and studies focussed on 1p12, 1p32.3 and 1q12-21 identified potential causal genes including TENT5C, CDKN2C, CKS1B, PDZK1, BCL9, ANP32E, ILF2, ADAR, MDM2 and MCL1 but none fully explain the clinical behavior. To address this deficiency and to relate chromatin structure to gene deregulation we present a multiomic bioinformatic analysis of SV, CNA, mutation and expression changes in relation to the chromatin structure of chr1. Methods We analysed data derived from 1,154 CoMMpass trial patients. We analyzed 972 NDMM patients with whole exome for mutations, and 752 whole genomes for copy number, translocations, complex rearrangements such as CP, CT and TI as previously described. Using GISTIC 2.0, we identified hotspots of CNA. This information was then analyzed in conjunction to the RNA-seq data derived from 643 patients to determine the aberrant transcriptional landscape of chr1. Using HiC data derived from U266 MM cell line, we associated these changes with TAD structures, A/B compartments, and histone marks along chr1, to gene expression changes, and recurrent SV. Using the cell line dependency map for CRISPR knockdown of the gene set on chr1 derived from 20 MM cell lines we related cell viability to chr1 copy number status. Results * We identified 7 hotspots of deletion, 9 of gain, 3 of CT and 2 of templated-insertion across chr1. We mapped these regions to epigenetic plots and show that gained regions are hypomethylated compared to the rest of chr1 (Wilcoxon, p=0.0002). Overall 69% of gain(1q) and 45% of the non-gained hotspots were in A compartments (chi 2=11, p=0.0009) and had an overall higher compartment score (p=0.01). * The recurrent regions of loss on 1p confirm the clinical relevance of this region. The critical importance of TENT5C, CDKN2C and RPL5 is identified by the impact of deletion, mutation and the rearrangement of superenhancers. Further this convergence of multiple oncogeneic mechanisms to a single locus points to a number of novel candidate drivers including FUB1 and NTRK1. * We provide important new information on 1q21.1-1q25.2 encompassing 145-180Mb a transcriptionally dense region containing 6 GISTIC 2.0 hotspots of gain (G2-G7). The hotspots occur within TAD structures that correlate upregulation of known drivers listed above and also identified novel potential upregulated drivers including POU2F1, a transcription factor, CREG1, an adenovirus E1A protein that both activates and represses gene expression promoting proliferation and inhibiting differentiation (G6) and BTG2 a G1/S transition regulator (G8). These data for copy number gain provides strong evidence for the prognostic relevance of of multiple drivers within deregulated TADs rather than single candidate genes. It also highlights the importance of the chromatin structure of Chr1 in the generation of these events. * Using dependency map CRISPR data we identified 320 essential genes for at least one cell line (>1). A common set of 31 genes were identified including 3 proteasome subunits (PSMA5, PSMB2, PSMB4), three regulators of ubiquitin-protein transferase activity (RPL5, RPL11, CDC20), splicing (SF3B4, SF3A3, SFPQ, RNPC3, SRNPE, PRPF38A, PRPF38B) and DTL. A common dependency for 1q+ or 1p- was not identified but a number of dependencies were identified in more than one cell line including UQCRH, SLCA1, CLSPN in 1p- cell lines and IPO9, PPIAL4G, and MRPS2 in 1q+. Conclusion We present an elegant anatomic map of chr1 at the genetic and epigenetic levels providing an unprecedented level of resolution for the relationships of structural variants to epigenetic, expression and mutation status. The analysis highlights the importance of active chromatin in gene deregulation by SV and CNA where the importance of multiple gene deregulation within TAD structures is critical to MM pathogenesis. The implications are that we could improve prognostic assignment and identify new targets for therapy by further characterizing these relationships. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Braunstein: Jansen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Adaptive: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; AstraZeneca: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Epizyme: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Davies: Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sanofi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Oncopeptides: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Constellation: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celgene/BMS: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.
Copyright
EMBASE:2016082367
ISSN: 0006-4971
CID: 5098702

Unifying the Definition of High-Risk in Multiple Myeloma [Meeting Abstract]

Siegel, A; Boyle, E M; Blaney, P; Wang, Y; Ghamlouch, H; Choi, J; Caro, J; Williams, L; Razzo, B; Arbini, A A; Braunstein, M; Kaminetzky, D; Auclair, D; Pawlyn, C; Cairns, D; Jackson, G; Walker, B; Bruno, B; Morgan, G J; Davies, F E
Introduction: There is considerable heterogeneity in the clinical outcome of newly diagnosed multiple-myeloma (NDMM) with some patients having a good prognosis while others fail to respond or relapse quickly after therapy progressing rapidly to death. Using risk scores based on clinical, biochemical and genetic features it is possible to predict some of this variation giving an ability to segment the disease into risk strata. Clinical studies have suggested that patients with standard-risk disease have benefited more from the recent advances in therapy compared to those with high-risk disease. The development of clinical trials specifically recruiting patients with high-risk disease features offers the potential to improve the outcome of a subgroup of patients with a very poor clinical outcome. To perform such studies is it important to have a unifying definition of high-risk including standard parameters, group size and outcome of individual risk strata so that clinical trial rigor can be achieved (e.g., common entry criteria, statistical power). In order to understand the size and feasibility of such studies we analyzed the Myeloma Genome Project (MGP) dataset to assess multiple risk factors and scores to determine and compare how they perform as risk stratifiers with each other.
Method(s): The MGP dataset is a large set of molecular and clinical data from 1273 patient with NDMM. Data were available on clinical variables (Albumin (Alb), B2-microglobulin (B2M), LDH, age), cytogenetic variables [t(4;14), t(14;16), t(14;20), 17p-, TP53 mutations, 1q+ and 1p-] and gene expression analysis (GEP70). A literature search was used to identify risk models used in clinical studies. Survival analysis was performed in R. The median follow-up at the time of analysis was 54.5 (53.2-56.5) months.
Result(s): The median patient age was 66 years, with 641 (50.4%) patients over age 65. The sex ratio (M:F) was 1:0.66. African American, White, and Asian constituted 17%, 76%, and 2%, of cases respectively. 26.7% received a stem cell transplant. We determined the size of the strata and actual risk (measure by the hazard ratios, HR) compared to standard risk cases for both PFS and OS of the various clinical models available, data are summarized in Figure 1. When looking at individual risk scores, the HR for progression for t(4;14), TP53 inactivation (deletion and mutations), gain(1q), and del(1p) were 1.4, 1.1, 1.3, and 1.1 respectively. When considering overall survival these HR were 1.4, 1.7, 1.5, and 1.4 respectively. We went on to analyze the impact of these events in combination and show that combined, there is increased specificity, especially for OS (HR 2.3-5.1) but they identify small subsets making up <10% of patients. We then analyzed the purely clinical scores (ISS) and combined clinical/genetic scores. We show again, that the more specific risk scores (double hit, Boyd IV, GEP70) identify between 7-13% of cases with HR (2-3.1) for OS. When we looked specifically at the younger patients (=< 65), similar trends were seen with GEP70 by RNA-seq offering one of the most interesting means of identifying HR cases.
Conclusion(s): In this large NDMM dataset, we demonstrate the clear variation in risk groups that occur dependent upon the approach used resulting in heterogeneous levels of risk, strata size, and performance. With the exception of GEP70, none of the single features are sensitive or specific enough to identify all cases. Risk models based on a combination of markers improve the ability to detect true high-risk disease but there remains variability. At a molecular level the inclusion of TP53 inactivation, and 1q+ improve the performance of the ISS. This analysis provides insights into standardizing the definition of high-risk and the generation of consensus definitions for clinical trial entry. Figure 1 [Formula presented] Disclosures: Braunstein: Jansen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Adaptive: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; AstraZeneca: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Epizyme: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Pfizer: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Pawlyn: Celgene / BMS: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Amgen: Honoraria; Sanofi: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Cairns: Amgen: Research Funding; Merck Sharpe and Dohme: Research Funding; Takeda: Research Funding; Celgene / BMS: Other: travel support, Research Funding. Jackson: GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; celgene BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; J and J: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; oncopeptides: Consultancy; Sanofi: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau. Morgan: BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Jansen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Oncopeptides: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; GSK: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Davies: Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sanofi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Oncopeptides: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Constellation: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celgene/BMS: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.
Copyright
EMBASE:2016062846
ISSN: 0006-4971
CID: 5099092

Hispanic or Latin American Ancestry Is Associated with a Similar Genomic Profile and a Trend Toward Inferior Outcomes in Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma As Compared to Non-Hispanic White Patients in the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) CoMMpassstudy [Meeting Abstract]

Williams, L; Blaney, P; Boyle, E M; Ghamlouch, H; Wang, Y; Choi, J; Bauer, M A; Siegel, A; Stoeckle, J; Razzo, B; Auclair, D; Kaminetzky, D; Braunstein, M; Bruno, B; Arbini, A A; Walker, B A; Davies, F E; Morgan, G J
Introduction Large clinical data sets suggest that the natural history and prognosis of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) differs between patients of European and African ancestry, with the latter group exhibiting an earlier age at onset and poorer overall prognosis in some studies. The use of next generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize the genomic landscape of multiple myeloma (MM) suggests that the observed phenotypic differences between these groups of patients may reflect distinct underlying genomic profiles and mutational processes. Thus far, characterizations of this type have focused principally on patients of African ancestry (AA). Here, we characterize the genomic features and outcomes of a large series of patients of Hispanic or Latin American ancestry (HL) as compared to their Non-Hispanic white (NHW) counterparts. Methods Subjects were selected from the MMRF CoMMpass SM trial, a study that includes 1,154 patients with updated outcome data as of March, 2020. Within this data set, 760 patients had information on race and ethnicity. Among these, 55 HL patients and 478 NHW patients possessed complete clinical and genomic information. We analyzed baseline whole exome sequencing (WES) and long insert whole genome sequencing (WGS) as previously described (Walker, et al. Blood 2019). Our analysis focused on 63 known driver mutations in multiple myeloma and 39 sites of common copy number variation across the study population. Complex structural variants and tumor telomere length were called using previously described bioinformatic tools (Boyle et al. Leukemia 2021). Survival analysis was undertaken using the Kaplan-Meier method with hazard ratios determined by the Cox proportional hazards model. Results In a comparison of clinical features between the Hispanic and NHW population, we did not identify any differences in age of onset, gender, presenting cytogenetics, International Staging System Score (ISS), and IMWG Risk Category. The proportion of patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation was similar between groups. We identified no statistically significant differences in the presence of characteristic translocations involving IgH locus or in hyperdiploidy status. No statistically significant differences in tumor mutational burden or loss-of-heterozygosity percentage emerged between HL and NHW patients. We examined non-synonymous variations (NSV) and copy number variations at the loci of known MM driver genes and encountered no statistically significant differences in NSV, copy number, or biallelic status. We further categorized genes into pathways relevant to the pathogenesis of MM and discovered no difference in the proportions of patients harboring mutations in genes related to the MEK/ERK and NF-kappaB pathways, cell cycle regulation, and epigenetic modification. We were unable to the distinguish either population based on the presence of chromothripsis or in the overall preponderance of an APOBEC mutational signature. Tumor telomere length was not significantly different between the populations. An analysis of overall and progression free survival (PFS) with a median duration of follow up of 44 months revealed a trend toward poorer outcomes among the HL population that did not reach statistical significance. Median PFS was 24 months in HL patients and 35 months in the NHW population (p = 0.19). Median OS was not reached in either ethnic subgroup. In terms of overall survival, age, ISS score, overall number of driver mutations, and the presence of chromothripsis emerged with a negative impact on outcome (Figures 1a, 1b). These variables with the exception of chromothripsis retained their significant impact on progression free survival (Figure 2a, 2b). Conclusion The correlation between Hispanic or Latin American ancestry and underlying disease biology in MM has yet to be fully elucidated. In our analysis, which was based on self-declared ancestry as opposed to admixture, no obvious differences in significant measures of genomic variation known to impact prognosis in MM emerged between HL and NHW patients. These results may help to inform the future large-scale studies to ascertain the impact of genomics, disease biology and socioeconomic factors on outcomes in this heterogeneous patient population. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Walker: Bristol Myers Squibb: Research Funding; Sanofi: Speakers Bureau. Morgan: BMS: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Jansen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Oncopeptides: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees.
Copyright
EMBASE:2016085983
ISSN: 1528-0020
CID: 5104232

Loss of FBXO31-mediated degradation of DUSP6 dysregulates ERK and PI3K-AKT signaling and promotes prostate tumorigenesis

Duan, Shanshan; Moro, Loredana; Qu, Rui; Simoneschi, Daniele; Cho, Hyunwoo; Jiang, Shaowen; Zhao, Huiyong; Chang, Qing; de Stanchina, Elisa; Arbini, Arnaldo A; Pagano, Michele
FBXO31 is the substrate receptor of one of many CUL1-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL1) complexes. Here, we show that low FBXO31 mRNA levels are associated with high pre-operative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and Gleason grade in human prostate cancer. Mechanistically, the ubiquitin ligase CRL1FBXO31 promotes the ubiquitylation-mediated degradation of DUSP6, a dual specificity phosphatase that dephosphorylates and inactivates the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2). Depletion of FBXO31 stabilizes DUSP6, suppresses ERK signaling, and activates the PI3K-AKT signaling cascade. Moreover, deletion of FBXO31 promotes tumor development in a mouse orthotopic model of prostate cancer. Treatment with BCI, a small molecule inhibitor of DUSP6, suppresses AKT activation and prevents tumor formation, suggesting that the FBXO31 tumor suppressor activity is dependent on DUSP6. Taken together, our studies highlight the relevance of the FBXO31-DUSP6 axis in the regulation of ERK- and PI3K-AKT-mediated signaling pathways, as well as its therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.
PMID: 34686346
ISSN: 2211-1247
CID: 5031132

CRL4AMBRA1 is a master regulator of D-type cyclins

Simoneschi, Daniele; Rona, Gergely; Zhou, Nan; Jeong, Yeon-Tae; Jiang, Shaowen; Milletti, Giacomo; Arbini, Arnaldo A; O'Sullivan, Alfie; Wang, Andrew A; Nithikasem, Sorasicha; Keegan, Sarah; Siu, Yik; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Maiani, Emiliano; Nazio, Francesca; Cecconi, Francesco; Boccalatte, Francesco; Fenyö, David; Jones, Drew R; Busino, Luca; Pagano, Michele
D-type cyclins are central regulators of the cell division cycle and are among the most frequently deregulated therapeutic targets in human cancer1, but the mechanisms that regulate their turnover are still being debated2,3. Here, by combining biochemical and genetics studies in somatic cells, we identify CRL4AMBRA1 (also known as CRL4DCAF3) as the ubiquitin ligase that targets all three D-type cyclins for degradation. During development, loss of Ambra1 induces the accumulation of D-type cyclins and retinoblastoma (RB) hyperphosphorylation and hyperproliferation, and results in defects of the nervous system that are reduced by treating pregnant mice with the FDA-approved CDK4 and CDK6 (CDK4/6) inhibitor abemaciclib. Moreover, AMBRA1 acts as a tumour suppressor in mouse models and low AMBRA1 mRNA levels are predictive of poor survival in cancer patients. Cancer hotspot mutations in D-type cyclins abrogate their binding to AMBRA1 and induce their stabilization. Finally, a whole-genome, CRISPR-Cas9 screen identified AMBRA1 as a regulator of the response to CDK4/6 inhibition. Loss of AMBRA1 reduces sensitivity to CDK4/6 inhibitors by promoting the formation of complexes of D-type cyclins with CDK2. Collectively, our results reveal the molecular mechanism that controls the stability of D-type cyclins during cell-cycle progression, in development and in human cancer, and implicate AMBRA1 as a critical regulator of the RB pathway.
PMID: 33854235
ISSN: 1476-4687
CID: 4846192

The molecular make up of smoldering myeloma highlights the evolutionary pathways leading to multiple myeloma

Boyle, Eileen M; Deshpande, Shayu; Tytarenko, Ruslana; Ashby, Cody; Wang, Yan; Bauer, Michael A; Johnson, Sarah K; Wardell, Christopher P; Thanendrarajan, Sharmilan; Zangari, Maurizio; Facon, Thierry; Dumontet, Charles; Barlogie, Bart; Arbini, Arnaldo; Rustad, Even H; Maura, Francesco; Landgren, Ola; Zhan, Fenghuang; van Rhee, Frits; Schinke, Carolina; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J; Walker, Brian A
Smoldering myeloma (SMM) is associated with a high-risk of progression to myeloma (MM). We report the results of a study of 82 patients with both targeted sequencing that included a capture of the immunoglobulin and MYC regions. By comparing these results to newly diagnosed myeloma (MM) we show fewer NRAS and FAM46C mutations together with fewer adverse translocations, del(1p), del(14q), del(16q), and del(17p) in SMM consistent with their role as drivers of the transition to MM. KRAS mutations are associated with a shorter time to progression (HR 3.5 (1.5-8.1), p = 0.001). In an analysis of change in clonal structure over time we studied 53 samples from nine patients at multiple time points. Branching evolutionary patterns, novel mutations, biallelic hits in crucial tumour suppressor genes, and segmental copy number changes are key mechanisms underlying the transition to MM, which can precede progression and be used to guide early intervention strategies.
PMCID:7804406
PMID: 33436579
ISSN: 2041-1723
CID: 4771132

CSF plasmablasts differentiate MS from other neurologic disorders [Letter]

Kister, I; Lotan, I; Wallach, A; Bacon, T; Cutter, G; Arbini, A
Multiparametric flow cytometry (FC) of CSF allows one to easily estimate the percentage of lymphocyte subpopulations in CSF. We hypothesized that an increased ratio of B-lineage cells in CSF of MS patients, as assessed with FC, could be useful for diagnostics. We analyzed CSF of 137 patients (70 MS, 24 infectious/autoimmune neurologic disorders (INDs), and 43 non-infectious/autoimmune neurologic disorders (NINDs)), and showed that CSF plasmablasts of >0.1% had a sensitivity of 40% for MS and specificity of 92% when comparing MS and IND, while plasmablasts of >0.25% had sensitivity of 36%, and 100% specificity.
PMID: 33383365
ISSN: 2211-0356
CID: 4762502