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Streamlining Prior Authorization to Improve Care

Busis, Neil A; Khokhar, Babar; Callaghan, Brian C
PMID: 37983023
ISSN: 2168-6157
CID: 5607842

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension [Case Report]

Jauregui, Ruben; Busis, Neil A
PMID: 38157502
ISSN: 1533-4406
CID: 5625842

A Comparison of Patients' and Neurologists' Assessments of their Teleneurology Encounter: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

Thawani, Sujata P; Minen, Mia T; Grossman, Scott N; Friedman, Steven; Bhatt, Jaydeep M; Foo, Farng-Yang A; Torres, Daniel M; Weinberg, Harold J; Kim, Nina H; Levitan, Valeriya; Cardiel, Myrna I; Zakin, Elina; Conway, Jenna M; Kurzweil, Arielle M; Hasanaj, Lisena; Stainman, Rebecca S; Seixas, Azizi; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Busis, Neil A
PMID: 37624656
ISSN: 1556-3669
CID: 5599032

The Transformation of Documenting and Coding for Neurologic Hospital Inpatient and Observation Services

Villanueva, Raissa; Busis, Neil A; Cohen, Bruce H; Ciccarelli, Luana
Landmark changes to documenting and coding for office or other outpatient evaluation and management (E/M) codes were implemented on January 1, 2021. To decrease clinicians' administrative burden, many documentation requirements were eliminated. In addition, major changes were made in how medical decision making and time spent on the date of the encounter are used to determine the level of service. On January 1, 2023, these changes were extended to inpatient and observation E/M services. The level of service in both inpatient and outpatient settings can now be selected based on the total time dedicated to the patient's care on the day of the encounter or the new method of medical decision making. This article discusses the optimal ways to document and code for inpatient hospital and observation encounters after January 1, 2023.
PMID: 37039413
ISSN: 1538-6899
CID: 5456352

Neurologists' Evaluations of Experience and Effectiveness of Teleneurology Encounters

Thawani, Sujata P; Minen, Mia T; Stainman, Rebecca S; Friedman, Steven; Bhatt, Jaydeep M; Foo, Farng-Yang A; Torres, Daniel M; Weinberg, Harold J; Kim, Nina H; Levitan, Valeriya; Cardiel, Myrna I; Zakin, Elina; Conway, Jenna M; Kurzweil, Arielle M; Hasanaj, Lisena; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Busis, Neil A
PMID: 35834603
ISSN: 1556-3669
CID: 5266202

Headache clinicians' perspectives on the remote monitoring of patients' electronic diary data: A qualitative study

Minen, Mia T; George, Alexis; Katara, Aarti; Lebowitz, Naomi; Snyder, Ivy Charlotte; Busis, Neil A; Lipchitz, Jessica M
OBJECTIVE:We assessed headache clinicians' viewpoints on potential remote access to patients' digital headache diary data and the practicalities of data utilization. BACKGROUND:With the ubiquitous nature of electronic medical records and the existence of remote monitoring (RM) for many medical conditions, there is now the potential for remote symptom monitoring for patients with headache disorders. While patients are asked to utilize headache diaries, clinicians may or may not have access to the data before patient visits, and their perspectives regarding this emerging technology are currently unknown. METHODS:After recruiting participants from the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium Network, the American Headache Society Special Interest Section listservs, and Twitter and Facebook social media platforms, we conducted 20 semi-structured qualitative interviews of headache providers across the United States from various types of institutions and asked them their perspectives on remote access to patient headache diary data. We transcribed the interviews, which were then coded by two independent coders. Themes and sub-themes were developed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS:All clinicians felt the RM data needed to be integrated into the electronic medical record. Six themes emerged from the interviews: (i) Clinician perspectives on how RM could be beneficial but at other times could create obstacles/challenges, (ii) operationally, data integration could benefit headache care, (iii) there should be initial logistical considerations for bringing RM into clinical care, (iv) education may need to be provided to both patients and clinicians, (v) there are likely research benefits associated with RM, and (vi) additional suggestions for considering potential integration of RM into practice. CONCLUSIONS:While headache clinicians had mixed opinions on the benefits/challenges that RM presents to patient care, patient satisfaction, and visit time, new ideas emerged that may help advance the field.
PMID: 37313636
ISSN: 1526-4610
CID: 5506912

Curriculum Innovations: A Comprehensive Teleneurology Curriculum for Neurology Trainees

Han, Steve C; Stainman, Rebecca S; Busis, Neil A; Grossman, Scott N; Thawani, Sujata P; Kurzweil, Arielle M
ORIGINAL:0017001
ISSN: 2771-9979
CID: 5545162

The use of virtual complementary and integrative therapies by neurology outpatients: An exploratory analysis of two cross-sectional studies assessing the use of technology as treatment in an academic neurology department in New York City

Minen, Mia T; Busis, Neil A; Friedman, Steven; Campbell, Maya; Sahu, Ananya; Maisha, Kazi; Hossain, Quazi; Soviero, Mia; Verma, Deepti; Yao, Leslie; Foo, Farng-Yang A; Bhatt, Jaydeep M; Balcer, Laura J; Galetta, Steven L; Thawani, Sujata
Background/UNASSIGNED:Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, about half of patients from populations that sought care in neurology tried complementary and integrative therapies (CITs). With the increased utilization of telehealth services, we sought to determine whether patients also increased their use of virtual CITs. Methods/UNASSIGNED:We examined datasets from two separate cross-sectional surveys that included cohorts of patients with neurological disorders. One was a dataset from a study that examined patient and provider experiences with teleneurology visits; the other was a study that assessed patients with a history of COVID-19 infection who presented for neurologic evaluation. We assessed and reported the use of virtual (and non-virtual) CITs using descriptive statistics, and determined whether there were clinical characteristics that predicted the use of CITs using logistic regression analyses. Findings/UNASSIGNED:Patients who postponed medical treatment for non-COVID-19-related problems during the pandemic were more likely to seek CITs. Virtual exercise, virtual psychotherapy, and relaxation/meditation smartphone applications were the most frequent types of virtual CITs chosen by patients. In both studies, age was a key demographic factor associated with mobile/virtual CIT usage. Interpretations/UNASSIGNED:Our investigation demonstrates that virtual CIT-related technologies were utilized in the treatment of neurologic conditions during the pandemic, particularly by those patients who deferred non-COVID-related care.
PMCID:9297463
PMID: 35874862
ISSN: 2055-2076
CID: 5276172

Technology as treatment: An exploratory study on the use of virtual complementary and integrative therapies by neurology outpatients [Meeting Abstract]

Minen, M T; Busis, N; Friedman, S; Campbell, M; Sahu, A; Maisha, K; Hossain, Q; Soviero, M; Verma, D; Yao, L; Foo, F; Bhatt, J; Balcer, L; Galetta, S L; Thawani, S
One sentence summary: The purpose of this investigation was to expand the evidence base on CITs delivered by telehealth by evaluating CIT use in patients who presented to a large urban tertiary care neurology practice and to examine predictors of CIT use during the pandemic.
Background(s): Patients with neurological disorders may seek treatment options in addition to those recommended by their providers. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, about half of patients from populations that sought care in neurology tried complementary and integrative therapies (CITs). Given the reductions in in-person visits and the increases in teleneurology visits, we sought to determine whether patients increased their use of virtual complementary and integrative therapies.
Method(s): By examining two separate datasets that included cohorts of patients with neurological disorders, we assessed patients' use of virtual (and non-virtual) CITs and determined whether there were clinical characteristics that predicted their use. The two studies that comprised this report included one that examined patient and provider experiences with teleneurology visits, and another that assessed patients with a history of COVID-19 infection who presented for neurologic evaluation.
Result(s): Patients who postponed medical treatment for non-COVID- 19- related problems during the pandemic were more likely to seek CITs. Virtual exercise, virtual psychotherapy and relaxation/meditation smartphone applications were the most frequent types of virtual CITs chosen by patients. In both studies, age was a key demographic factor associated with mobile/ virtual CIT usage.
Conclusion(s): Data from our investigations demonstrated that, in addition to its other roles in teleneurology, CIT-related technologies might be utilized in the treatment of neurologic conditions
EMBASE:638323851
ISSN: 1526-4610
CID: 5292742

The Transformation of Documenting and Coding: Evaluation and Management Codes for Outpatient Neurology Services

Villanueva, Raissa; Busis, Neil A; Cohen, Bruce H; Ciccarelli, Luana
ABSTRACT/UNASSIGNED:This article discusses the optimal ways to document and code for outpatient evaluation and management (E/M) codes. Since the changes for Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes 99202-99215 were finalized for 2021, they have been modified by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in their Medicare Physician Fee Schedule and by technical corrections issued on March 9, 2021. The 21st Century Cures Act mandated that patients can access their notes and test results immediately. These developments have transformed medical documentation and coding for outpatient E/M services. One year in, the authors have a better understanding of the subtleties of documenting and accurately determining levels of service for outpatient encounters using these new rules and regulations, and they share key insights gained by experience with the new system.
PMID: 34881737
ISSN: 1538-6899
CID: 5090822