Try a new search

Format these results:

Searched for:

person:chernb02

in-biosketch:true

Total Results:

7


Expert Consensus Statement: Pediatric Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy

Baldassari, Cristina M; Lam, Derek J; Ishman, Stacey L; Chernobilsky, Boris; Friedman, Norman R; Giordano, Terri; Lawlor, Claire; Mitchell, Ron B; Nardone, Heather; Ruda, James; Zalzal, Habib; Deneal, Adrienne; Dhepyasuwan, Nui; Rosenfeld, Richard M
OBJECTIVE:To develop an expert consensus statement on pediatric drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) that clarifies controversies and offers opportunities for quality improvement. Pediatric DISE was defined as flexible endoscopy to examine the upper airway of a child with obstructive sleep apnea who is sedated and asleep. METHODS:Development group members with expertise in pediatric DISE followed established guidelines for developing consensus statements. A search strategist systematically reviewed the literature, and the best available evidence was used to compose consensus statements regarding DISE in children 0 to 18 years old. Topics with significant practice variation and those that would improve the quality of patient care were prioritized. RESULTS:The development group identified 59 candidate consensus statements, based on 50 initial proposed topics, that focused on addressing the following high-yield topics: (1) indications and utility, (2) protocol, (3) optimal sedation, (4) grading and interpretation, (5) complications and safety, and (6) outcomes for DISE-directed surgery. After 2 iterations of the Delphi survey and removal of duplicative statements, 26 statements met the criteria for consensus; 11 statements were designated as no consensus. Several areas, such as the role of DISE at the time of adenotonsillectomy, were identified as needing further research. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:Expert consensus was achieved for 26 statements pertaining to indications, protocol, and outcomes for pediatric DISE. Clinicians can use these statements to improve quality of care, inform policy and protocols, and identify areas of uncertainty. Future research, ideally randomized controlled trials, is warranted to address additional controversies related to pediatric DISE.
PMID: 33400611
ISSN: 1097-6817
CID: 4738762

Clinical Practice Guideline: Nosebleed (Epistaxis) Executive Summary

Tunkel, David E; Anne, Samantha; Payne, Spencer C; Ishman, Stacey L; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Abramson, Peter J; Alikhaani, Jacqueline D; Benoit, Margo McKenna; Bercovitz, Rachel S; Brown, Michael D; Chernobilsky, Boris; Feldstein, David A; Hackell, Jesse M; Holbrook, Eric H; Holdsworth, Sarah M; Lin, Kenneth W; Lind, Meredith Merz; Poetker, David M; Riley, Charles A; Schneider, John S; Seidman, Michael D; Vadlamudi, Venu; Valdez, Tulio A; Nnacheta, Lorraine C; Monjur, Taskin M
OBJECTIVE:Nosebleed, also known as epistaxis, is a common problem that occurs at some point in at least 60% of people in the United States. While the great majority of nosebleeds are limited in severity and duration, about 6% of people who experience nosebleeds will seek medical attention. For the purposes of this guideline, we define the target patient with a nosebleed as a patient with bleeding from the nostril, nasal cavity, or nasopharynx that is sufficient to warrant medical advice or care. This includes bleeding that is severe, persistent, and/or recurrent, as well as bleeding that impacts a patient's quality of life. Interventions for nosebleeds range from self-treatment and home remedies to more intensive procedural interventions in medical offices, emergency departments, hospitals, and operating rooms. Epistaxis has been estimated to account for 0.5% of all emergency department visits and up to one-third of all otolaryngology-related emergency department encounters. Inpatient hospitalization for aggressive treatment of severe nosebleeds has been reported in 0.2% of patients with nosebleeds. PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE:The primary purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in the management of nosebleeds and to create clear and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specific goals of this guideline are to promote best practices, reduce unjustified variations in care of patients with nosebleeds, improve health outcomes, and minimize the potential harms of nosebleeds or interventions to treat nosebleeds. The target patient for the guideline is any individual aged ≥3 years with a nosebleed or history of nosebleed who needs medical treatment or seeks medical advice. The target audience of this guideline is clinicians who evaluate and treat patients with nosebleed. This includes primary care providers such as family medicine physicians, internists, pediatricians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners. It also includes specialists such as emergency medicine providers, otolaryngologists, interventional radiologists/neuroradiologists and neurointerventionalists, hematologists, and cardiologists. The setting for this guideline includes any site of evaluation and treatment for a patient with nosebleed, including ambulatory medical sites, the emergency department, the inpatient hospital, and even remote outpatient encounters with phone calls and telemedicine. Outcomes to be considered for patients with nosebleed include control of acute bleeding, prevention of recurrent episodes of nasal bleeding, complications of treatment modalities, and accuracy of diagnostic measures. This guideline addresses the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nosebleed. It will focus on nosebleeds that commonly present to clinicians with phone calls, office visits, and emergency room encounters. This guideline discusses first-line treatments such as nasal compression, application of vasoconstrictors, nasal packing, and nasal cautery. It also addresses more complex epistaxis management, which includes the use of endoscopic arterial ligation and interventional radiology procedures. Management options for 2 special groups of patients, patients with hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome (HHT) and patients taking medications that inhibit coagulation and/or platelet function, are included in this guideline. This guideline is intended to focus on evidence-based quality improvement opportunities judged most important by the working group. It is not intended to be a comprehensive, general guide for managing patients with nosebleed. In this context, the purpose is to define useful actions for clinicians, generalists, and specialists from a variety of disciplines to improve quality of care. Conversely, the statements in this guideline are not intended to limit or restrict care provided by clinicians based upon their experience and assessment of individual patients. ACTION STATEMENTS/UNASSIGNED:(7b) The clinician may perform, or may refer to a clinician who can perform, nasal endoscopy to examine the nasal cavity and nasopharynx in patients with epistaxis that is difficult to control or when there is concern for unrecognized pathology contributing to epistaxis.
PMID: 31910122
ISSN: 1097-6817
CID: 4257202

Clinical Practice Guideline: Nosebleed (Epistaxis)

Tunkel, David E; Anne, Samantha; Payne, Spencer C; Ishman, Stacey L; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Abramson, Peter J; Alikhaani, Jacqueline D; Benoit, Margo McKenna; Bercovitz, Rachel S; Brown, Michael D; Chernobilsky, Boris; Feldstein, David A; Hackell, Jesse M; Holbrook, Eric H; Holdsworth, Sarah M; Lin, Kenneth W; Lind, Meredith Merz; Poetker, David M; Riley, Charles A; Schneider, John S; Seidman, Michael D; Vadlamudi, Venu; Valdez, Tulio A; Nnacheta, Lorraine C; Monjur, Taskin M
OBJECTIVE:. Interventions for nosebleeds range from self-treatment and home remedies to more intensive procedural interventions in medical offices, emergency departments, hospitals, and operating rooms. Epistaxis has been estimated to account for 0.5% of all emergency department visits and up to one-third of all otolaryngology-related emergency department encounters. Inpatient hospitalization for aggressive treatment of severe nosebleeds has been reported in 0.2% of patients with nosebleeds. PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE:The primary purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in the management of nosebleeds and to create clear and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specific goals of this guideline are to promote best practices, reduce unjustified variations in care of patients with nosebleeds, improve health outcomes, and minimize the potential harms of nosebleeds or interventions to treat nosebleeds. The target patient for the guideline is any individual aged ≥3 years with a nosebleed or history of nosebleed who needs medical treatment or seeks medical advice. The target audience of this guideline is clinicians who evaluate and treat patients with nosebleed. This includes primary care providers such as family medicine physicians, internists, pediatricians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners. It also includes specialists such as emergency medicine providers, otolaryngologists, interventional radiologists/neuroradiologists and neurointerventionalists, hematologists, and cardiologists. The setting for this guideline includes any site of evaluation and treatment for a patient with nosebleed, including ambulatory medical sites, the emergency department, the inpatient hospital, and even remote outpatient encounters with phone calls and telemedicine. Outcomes to be considered for patients with nosebleed include control of acute bleeding, prevention of recurrent episodes of nasal bleeding, complications of treatment modalities, and accuracy of diagnostic measures. This guideline addresses the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nosebleed. It focuses on nosebleeds that commonly present to clinicians via phone calls, office visits, and emergency room encounters. This guideline discusses first-line treatments such as nasal compression, application of vasoconstrictors, nasal packing, and nasal cautery. It also addresses more complex epistaxis management, which includes the use of endoscopic arterial ligation and interventional radiology procedures. Management options for 2 special groups of patients-patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome and patients taking medications that inhibit coagulation and/or platelet function-are included in this guideline. This guideline is intended to focus on evidence-based quality improvement opportunities judged most important by the guideline development group. It is not intended to be a comprehensive, general guide for managing patients with nosebleed. In this context, the purpose is to define useful actions for clinicians, generalists, and specialists from a variety of disciplines to improve quality of care. Conversely, the statements in this guideline are not intended to limit or restrict care provided by clinicians based on their experience and assessment of individual patients. ACTION STATEMENTS/UNASSIGNED:(7b) The clinician may perform, or may refer to a clinician who can perform, nasal endoscopy to examine the nasal cavity and nasopharynx in patients with epistaxis that is difficult to control or when there is concern for unrecognized pathology contributing to epistaxis.
PMID: 31910111
ISSN: 1097-6817
CID: 4257192

Hypoglossal Nerve Upper Airway Stimulator Implantation after Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Malignancy [Case Report]

Zheng, Zhong; Hu, Shirley; Chernobilsky, Boris
PMID: 28419805
ISSN: 1097-6817
CID: 3155822

Dermatofibroma of the Auricle [Case Report]

Kadakia, Sameep; Chernobilsky, Boris; Iacob, Codrin
An adolescent male presented to the office with a 3-month history of a small left ear mass located on the posterior helix. Although the patient was asymptomatic, the decision was made to remove the mass in the operating room and send for pathology. Following excision, the mass was stained and examined by the pathologist. Staining positive for Factor VIIIa and CD68, the lesion was also found to have a combination of histiocytes and fibroblastic spindle cells. The diagnosis of dermatofibroma, cellular type, was made and the patient required no further treatment. Seen in follow up several months after, there was complete resolution of the mass. <br /><br /> <em>J Drugs Dermatol.</em> 2016;15(10):1270-1272.
PMID: 27741347
ISSN: 1545-9616
CID: 3155812

Electronic medical records for otolaryngology office-based practice

Chernobilsky, Boris; Boruk, Marina
PURPOSE OF REVIEW/OBJECTIVE:Pressure is mounting on physicians to adopt electronic medical records. The field of health information technology is evolving rapidly with innovations and policies often outpacing science. We sought to review research and discussions about electronic medical records from the past year to keep abreast of these changes. RECENT FINDINGS/RESULTS:Original scientific research, especially from otolaryngologists, is lacking in this field. Adoption rates are slowly increasing, but more of the burden is shouldered by physicians despite policy efforts and the clear benefits to third-party payers. Scientific research from the past year suggests lack of improvements and even decreasing quality of healthcare with electronic medical record adoption in the ambulatory care setting. The increasing prevalence and standardization of electronic medical record systems results in a new set of problems including rising costs, audits, difficulties in transition and public concerns about security of information. SUMMARY/CONCLUSIONS:As major players in healthcare continue to push for adoption, increased effort must be made to demonstrate actual improvements in patient care in the ambulatory care setting. More scientific studies are needed to demonstrate what features of electronic medical records actually improve patient care. Otolaryngologists should help each other by disseminating research about improvement in patient outcomes with their systems since current adoption and outcomes policies do not apply to specialists.
PMID: 18197019
ISSN: 1531-6998
CID: 3155802

Age as a prognostic factor for complications of major head and neck surgery

Boruk, Marina; Chernobilsky, Boris; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Har-El, Gady
OBJECTIVE: To determine if age alone is a prognostic indicator of surgical outcomes for major head and neck procedures. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study over a 4-year period. SETTING: Academic referral center, institutional practice, hospitalized care. PATIENTS: Included in this study were patients who had undergone ablative, reconstructive, and other major surgical procedures of the head and neck, including neck dissection, laryngectomy, maxillectomy, thyroidectomy with lymphadenectomy, and composite resection of the oral cavity with reconstruction, for both malignant and benign disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient data and intraoperative and postoperative course factors were recorded. Comorbidity was graded using an Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 test, Charlson Comorbidity Index, and American Society of Anesthesiology score. Postoperative complications were dichotomized, and multiple logistic regression was used for data analysis. RESULTS: Medical chart review identified 157 cases. Analysis of data revealed that time under general anesthesia was the only factor consistently related to complications (P<.006), and it was the only factor consistently related to length of stay (P<.001). Analysis of major complications (6% incidence) as an outcome using univariate analysis resulted in a strong positive correlation with both comorbidity indexes: Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 (P = .002) and Charlson Comorbidity Index (P = .005). Multiple logistic regression showed no significant relationship between age 70 years or older (20% of patients) and either complications or hospital length of stay. CONCLUSIONS: Patient's age alone is not a prognostic indicator of surgical outcome for major head and neck procedures. However, comorbidity is an important predictive factor for postoperative complications in any age group. Time under general anesthesia showed a statistically significant relationship with complication rate and hospital length of stay in multivariate analyses. Consequently, prevention of complications should focus on optimizing preoperative comorbid conditions
PMID: 16027283
ISSN: 0886-4470
CID: 142800