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Standardizing quality of virtual urgent care: Utilizing standardized patients in unique experiential onboarding [Meeting Abstract]

Lakdawala, V S; Sartori, D; Levitt, H; Sherwin, J; Testa, P; Zabar, S
Intro/Background: Virtual Urgent Care (VUC) is now a common modality for providing real-time assessment and treatment of common low acuity medical problems. However, most physicians have not had formal telemedicine training or clinical experience and therefore lack proficiency with this new modality of healthcare delivery. We created an experiential onboarding program deploying standardized patients (SPs) into a VUC platform to assess and deliver feedback to physicians, providing individual-level quality assurance and identifying program-level areas for improvement. Purpose/Objective: The objective of this program was to create an experiential training module for physicians as part of their VUC onboarding process with the goal of quality assurance and patient safety. The onboarding experience incorporated common standards for doctor-patient communication as well as the unique skills necessary for the practice of telemedicine. The encounters were unobserved by other faculty, providing participants with a safe and confidential environment to receive feedback on their communication and telemedicine skills.
Method(s): We simulated a synchronous urgent care evaluation of a 25-year-old man with lingering viral upper respiratory tract symptoms refractory to over-thecounter medications. SP training included strongly requesting an antibiotic prescription. A mock electronic medical record encounter provided physicians with demographic and prior medical history. The announced SP appointment occurred during a routine VUC shift. Our behaviorally-anchored assessment tool evaluated communication, case-specific, and telemedicine-specific skills. Response options comprised 'not done,' 'partly done,' and 'well done.' Outcomes (if available): Twenty-one physicians provided appropriate management without prescribing antibiotics. Physicians performed 'well done' in Information Gathering (93%) and Relationship Development (99%) domains. In contrast, Education and Counseling skills were less strong (32% 'well done'); few received 'well done' for checking understanding (14%); conveying and summarizing information (9%). Telemedicine skills were infrequently used: 19% performed virtual physical exam, 24% utilized audio/video interface to augment information gathering, 14% assessed sound, video or ensured backup plan should video fail.
Summary: This experiential virtual urgent care onboarding program utilizing standardized patient announced encounters uncovers several areas for improvement within telemedicine-specific and patient education domains. Participating VUC physicians had 2 to 23 years of clinical experience. Results illustrate that irrespective of experience, telemedicine visits create a unique set of challenges to the traditional way physicians are taught to engage with their patients. Overall, the onboarding exercise was well received by participating physicians. At the conclusion of the visit, SPs provided immediate verbal feedback to urgent care physicians, who received a summary report and had an opportunity provide structured feedback regarding the case. A subset of urgent care physicians (n=9) provided feedback regarding the case; 100% 'somewhat or strongly agreed' that the encounter improved their confidence communicating via the video interface and helped improve telehealth skills. Our innovative onboarding program utilizing highly trained standardized patients can uncover potential gaps in telemedicinespecific skills and form the basis for dedicated training for virtual urgent care physicians to assure quality and patient safety
EMBASE:632418582
ISSN: 1553-2712
CID: 4547892

THE VIRTUAL OSCE: PREPARING TRAINEES TO USE TELEMEDICINE AS A TOOL FOR TRANSITIONS OF CARE [Meeting Abstract]

Sartori, Daniel; Horlick, Margaret; Hayes, Rachael; Adams, Jennifer; Zabar, Sondra R.
ISI:000567143602390
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4799312

DEVELOPMENT OF A STRUCTURED POINT-OF-CARE ULTRASOUND CURRICULUM FOR INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENTS [Meeting Abstract]

Srisarajivakul, Nalinee C.; Janjigian, Michael; Dembitzer, Anne; Sartori, Daniel; Hardowar, Khemraj; Cooke, Deborah; Sauthoff, Harald
ISI:000567143602270
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4799392

MEDICAL EDUCATION EPIDEMIOLOGY IN RESIDENCY: PRACTICE HABITS AS A DRIVER OF CURRICULAR INNOVATION [Meeting Abstract]

Rhee, David; Kim-Baazov, Anna; Sartori, Daniel
ISI:000567143602337
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4799332

A CASE OF WALKING-STICK URETERS AND HEPATIC ABNORMALITIES ASSOCIATED WITH KETAMINE USE [Meeting Abstract]

Attina, Teresa; Rhee, David; Ali, Yahya; Sartori, Daniel
ISI:000567143601142
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4848792

Preparing trainees for telemedicine: a virtual OSCE pilot

Sartori, Daniel J; Olsen, Sonja; Weinshel, Elizabeth; Zabar, Sondra R
PMID: 30859605
ISSN: 1365-2923
CID: 3747842

Antithrombotic Dilemmas after Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Watchman Device Placement [Case Report]

Ahuja, Tania; Murphy, Scarlett; Sartori, Daniel J
Antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has dramatically shifted from warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, to the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) such as dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban. In patients with contraindications to oral anticoagulation, left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) devices, such as the Watchmanâ„¢ device, may be considered; however, temporary postimplantation antithrombotic therapy is still a recommended practice. We present a case of complex antithrombotic management, post LAAO device implantation, designed to avoid drug interactions with concomitant rifampin use and remained necessary secondary to subsequent device leak. This case highlights the challenges of antithrombotic therapy post LAAO device placement in a complex, but representative, patient.
PMCID:6512040
PMID: 31183220
ISSN: 2090-6404
CID: 3929922

TEACHING TELEHEALTH: USING VIRTUAL STANDARDIZED PATIENTS TO ASSESS ESSENTIAL REMOTE INTERVIEWING AND PHYSICAL EXAM SKILLS [Meeting Abstract]

Sartori, Daniel J.; Rastogi, Natasha; Watsula-Morley, Amanda; Zabar, Sondra
ISI:000442641404059
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4449882

The Effect of Time to Endoscopy on Patient and Procedural Outcomes Among Foreign Body Swallowers: A Prospective Study [Meeting Abstract]

Ali, Rabia; Sartori, Daniel; Chhabra, Natasha; Minhas, Hadi J; Fang, Yixin; Williams, Renee; Goodman, Adam J
ISI:000403087401190
ISSN: 1097-6779
CID: 2611342

Typhoid Fever and Acute Appendicitis: A Rare Association Not Yet Fully Formed

Sartori, Daniel J; Sun, Katherine; Hopkins, Mary Ann; Sloane, Mark F
Infections caused by foodborne enteric pathogens including typhoidal and non-typhoidal Salmonella species can mimic symptoms of acute appendicitis. The association between such bacterial pathogens and pathology-proven acute appendicitis has been described, but this link is poorly understood. Here we describe a case of a young man with typhoid fever presenting with histology-proven acute appendicitis requiring urgent appendectomy, and provide a brief review of relevant literature to prompt more widespread recognition of this rare cause of a common surgical emergency.
PMCID:5624233
PMID: 29033762
ISSN: 1662-0631
CID: 2742462