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American college of allergy, asthma & immunology position paper on the use of telemedicine for allergists

Elliott, Tania; Shih, Jennifer; Dinakar, Chitra; Portnoy, Jay; Fineman, Stanley
The integration of telecommunications and information systems in health care first began four decades ago with 500 patient consultations performed via interactive television. The use of telemedicine services and technology to deliver health care at a distance is increasing exponentially. Concomitant with this rapid expansion is the exciting ability to provide enhancements in quality and safety of care. Telemedicine enables increased access to care, improvement in health outcomes, reduction in medical costs, better resource use, expanded educational opportunities, and enhanced collaboration between patients and physicians. These potential benefits should be weighed against the risks and challenges of using telemedicine. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology advocates for incorporation of meaningful and sustained use of telemedicine in allergy and immunology practice. This article serves to offer policy and position statements of the use of telemedicine pertinent to the allergy and immunology subspecialty.
SCOPUS:85108647641
ISSN: 1609-3607
CID: 4962602

Beyond Convenience: Patients' Perceptions of Physician Interactional Skills and Compassion via Telemedicine

Elliott, Tania; Tong, Ian; Sheridan, Arwen; Lown, Beth A
Objectives/UNASSIGNED:To understand the interpersonal and communication behaviors that are perceived positively by patients in a video encounter and whether patient-centered relationships can be established virtually. Patients and Methods/UNASSIGNED:A qualitative analysis of patient visit feedback was performed to build consensus around exemplary interpersonal and communication practices during a virtual urgent care visit. Voluntarily submitted patient comments associated with a 5-star review after a visit were randomly selected from more than 49,000 comments in an 11-month period, from January 1, 2016, through November 30, 2016. Researchers used a consensus-based, widely used health care communications framework as a sensitizing scaffold to develop a preliminary set of codes. Results/UNASSIGNED:More than 30% of the comments coded were classified as Building Rapport. The next most frequently assigned code was Shares Information/Provides Guidance. Among codable comments, the third most frequently assigned code was Elicits Information. Provided Treatment accounted for only 2% of comments. Conclusion/UNASSIGNED:These results suggest that patients who are satisfied with telemedicine encounters appreciate their relational experiences with the clinician and overall user experience, including access and convenience. Highly satisfied patients who interacted with providers on this platform commented on key aspects of medical communication, particularly skills that demonstrate patient-centered relationship building. This supports the notion that clinician-patient relationships can be established in a video-first model, without a previous in-person encounter, and that positive ratings do not seem to be focused solely on prescription receipt.
PMCID:7283934
PMID: 32542222
ISSN: 2542-4548
CID: 4485552

Telemedicine in the Era of COVID-19 [Editorial]

Portnoy, Jay; Waller, Morgan; Elliott, Tania
PMCID:7104202
PMID: 32220575
ISSN: 2213-2201
CID: 4371142

The Role of Mobile Health Technologies in Allergy Care: an EAACI Position Paper

Matricardi, Paolo Maria; Dramburg, Stephanie; Alvarez-Perea, Alberto; Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Apfelbacher, Christian; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina; Berger, Uwe; Blaiss, Michael S; Blank, Simon; Boni, Elisa; Bonini, Matteo; Bousquet, Jean; Brockow, Knut; Buters, Jeroen; Cardona, Victoria; Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Cavkaytar, Özlem; Elliott, Tania; Esteban-Gorgojo, Ignacio; Fonseca, Joao A; Gardner, James; Gevaert, Philippe; Ghiordanescu, Ileana; Hellings, Peter; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Kalpaklioglu, A Fusun; Marmouz, Farid; Meijide Calderón, Ángela; Mösges, Ralph; Nakonechna, Alla; Ollert, Markus; Oteros, José; Pajno, Giovanni; Panaitescu, Catalina; Perez-Formigo, Daniel; Pfaar, Oliver; Pitsios, Constantinos; Rudenko, Michael; Ryan, Dermot; Sánchez-García, Silvia; Shih, Jennifer; Tripodi, Salvatore; Van der Poel, Lauri-Ann; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Varricchi, Gilda; Wittmann, Jörn; Worm, Margitta; Agache, Ioana
Mobile Health (mHealth) uses mobile communication devices such as smartphones and tablet computers to support and improve health-related services, data flow and information, patient self-management, surveillance, and disease management from the moment of first diagnosis to an optimized treatment. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology created a task force to assess the state of the art and future potential of mHealth in allergology. The task force endorsed the "Be He@lthy, Be Mobile" WHO initiative and debated the quality, usability, efficiency, advantages, limitations, and risks of mobile solutions for allergic diseases. The results are summarized in this position paper, analyzing also the regulatory background with regard to the "General Data Protection Regulation" and Medical Directives of the European Community. The task force assessed the design, user engagement, content, potential of inducing behavioral change, credibility/accountability, and privacy policies of mHealth products. The perspectives of health care professionals and allergic patients are discussed, underlining the need of thorough investigation for an effective design of mHealth technologies as auxiliary tools to improve quality of care. Within the context of precision medicine, these could facilitate the change in perspective from clinician- to patient-centered care. The current and future potential of mHealth is then examined for specific areas of allergology, including allergic rhinitis, aerobiology, allergen immunotherapy, asthma, dermatological diseases, food allergies, anaphylaxis, insect venom, and drug allergy. The impact of mobile technologies and associated big data sets are outlined. Facts, recommendations, and an action plan for future mHealth initiatives within EAACI are listed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PMID: 31230373
ISSN: 1398-9995
CID: 3963502

Telemedicine and emerging technologies for health care in allergy/immunology

Portnoy, Jay M; Pandya, Aarti; Waller, Morgan; Elliott, Tania
Telemedicine (TM) has become a popular method of accessing medical services between providers and patients and is viewed as a cost-effective alternative to more traditional episodic face-to-face encounters. TM overcomes 2 barriers that patients face when seeking health care: distance and time. It is as effective as in-person visits for outpatient treatment of asthma, and it is a convenient way to provide inpatient consultations for patients when the allergist practices outside of the hospital. TM also has been used to manage patients with asthma in schools. Patients tend to be as satisfied with TM or they prefer TM over in-person visits, but infrequently they do prefer in-person visits. In addition to virtual visits using TM, there are several emerging technologies that are relevant to the practice of allergy/immunology including electronic diaries (eg, symptoms and medication use), wearable technology (eg, to monitor activity and vital signs), remote patient monitoring (eg, environmental exposures and medication adherence) as well as electronic medical records augmented with clinical decision support. We believe that the use of TM, particularly when combined with information technologies such as electronic health records, has the potential to cause a transformational change in the way care is delivered by altering the process of interaction between patient and provider. TM addresses the shortage of allergy specialists in rural and underserved urban communities and facilitates patient access to allergy services. As patients take more control of their health care, use of TM is likely to increase because a large part of the move to adopt TM is driven by patient preference.
PMID: 32035604
ISSN: 1097-6825
CID: 4303792

Direct-to-Consumer Telemedicine

Elliott, Tania; Yopes, Margot C
The telemedicine industry and adoption of services have grown exponentially in the last 5 years, and the market is expected to reach more than $130 billion by 2025. Most US health institutions and hospital systems are currently using some form of telehealth, and more than 90% of health care executives surveyed across the United States have virtual care on their roadmap for growth. Telemedicine has been proposed as a way to expand the reach of allergy services and allow more patients to manage their disease with an allergy specialist. Technology can help address fragmentation of allergy care, which is currently provided in multiple clinical settings beyond the allergist's office including in primary care, pulmonary, dermatology, ear, nose, and throat, urgent care, and the emergency room. Remote monitoring, specialist second opinions, and synchronous and asynchronous encounters offer opportunities to streamline routine care, especially as smart hardware such as digital inhalers hit the market and reimbursement for telehealth services evolve. To date, allergy care has been a significant area of interest for direct-to-consumer telemedicine solutions, although the care has mainly been offered by nonallergists. Quality assurance and adherence to evidence-based standards, particularly in the self-pay direct-to-consumer space, warrant attention.
PMID: 31706486
ISSN: 2213-2201
CID: 4178202

Tele-Allergy: Here Today and Rapidly Advancing [Editorial]

Portnoy, Jay M; Elliott, Tania
PMID: 30832885
ISSN: 2213-2201
CID: 3723952

Direct to Consumer Telemedicine

Elliott, Tania; Shih, Jennifer
PURPOSE OF REVIEW/OBJECTIVE:Telemedicine uses technology to connect patients and data with providers at a distance. Direct to consumer telemedicine is a rapidly growing segment of the industry. RECENT FINDINGS/RESULTS:The telehealth market has skyrocketed in recent years, making it a multi-billion dollar industry. Direct to consumer telehealth, dominated by the for-profit private sector, is the most popular form. Direct to consumer telemedicine is a subset of telehealth that shows promise in increasing access to and engagement in medical care. Quality assurance, reimbursement, and regulatory oversight are important factors in assuring appropriate widespread adoption.
PMID: 30661123
ISSN: 1534-6315
CID: 3609852

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Position Paper on the Use of Telemedicine for Allergists

Elliott, Tania; Shih, Jennifer; Dinakar, Chitra; Portnoy, Jay; Fineman, Stanley
The integration of telecommunications and information systems in health care first began 4 decades ago with 500 patient consultations performed via interactive television. The use of telemedicine services and technology to deliver health care at a distance is increasing exponentially. Concomitant with this rapid expansion is the exciting ability to provide enhancements in quality and safety of care. Telemedicine enables increased access to care, improvement in health outcomes, reduction in medical costs, better resource use, expanded educational opportunities, and enhanced collaboration between patients and physicians. These potential benefits should be weighed against the risks and challenges of using telemedicine. The American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology advocates for incorporation of meaningful and sustained use of telemedicine in allergy and immunology practice. This article serves to offer policy and position statements of the use of telemedicine pertinent to the allergy and immunology subspecialty.
PMID: 29103799
ISSN: 1534-4436
CID: 2773332

Association between surgical indications, operative risk, and clinical outcome in infective endocarditis a prospective study from the international collaboration on endocarditis

Chu, V H; Park, L P; Athan, E; Delahaye, F; Freiberger, T; Lamas, C; Mudrick, D W; Strahilevitz, J; Tribouilloy, C; Durante-Mangoni, E; Pericas, J M; Fernandez-Hidalgo, N; Nacinovich, F; Rizk, H; Krajinovic, V; Giannitsioti, E; Hurley, J P; Hannan, M M; Wang, A; Clara, L; Sanchez, M; Casabe, J; Cortes, C; Oses, P F; Ronderos, R; Sucari, A; Thierer, J; Altclas, J; Kogan, S; Spelman, D; Harris, O; Kennedy, K; Tan, R; Papanicolas, L; Korman, T; Kotsanas, D; Dever, R; Jones, P; Konecny, P; Lawrence, R; Rees, D; Ryan, S; Feneley, M P; Harkness, J; Post, J; Reinbott, P; Gattringer, R; Wiesbauer, F; Andrade, A R; de, Brito A C P; Guimaraes, A C; Grinberg, M; Mansur, A J; Siciliano, R F; Strabelli, T M V; Vieira, M L C; de, Medeiros Tranchesi R A; Paiva, M G; Fortes, C Q; de, Oliveira Ramos A; Ferraiuoli, G; Golebiovski, W; Weksler, C; Karlowsky, J A; Keynan, Y; Morris, A M; Rubinstein, E; Jones, S B; Garcia, P; Cereceda, M; Mella, R M; Fernandez, R; Franco, L; Gonzalez, J; Jaramillo, A N; Barsic, B; Bukovski, S; Rudez, I; Vincelj, J; Pol, J; Malisova, B; Ashour, Z; El, Kholy A; Mishaal, M; Osama, D; Aissa, N; Alauzet, C; Alla, F; Campagnac, C; Doco-Lecompte, T; Selton-Suty, C; Casalta, J -P; Fournier, P -E; Habib, G; Raoult, D; Thuny, F; Delahaye, A; Vandenesch, F; Donal, E; Donnio, P Y; Flecher, E; Michelet, C; Revest, M; Tattevin, P; Chevalier, F; Jeu, A; Remadi, J P; Rusinaru, D; Bernard, Y; Chirouze, C; Hoen, B; Leroy, J; Plesiat, P; Naber, C; Neuerburg, C; Mazaheri, B; Athanasia, S; Giamarellou, H; Thomas, T; Mylona, E; Paniara, O; Papanicolaou, K; Pyros, J; Skoutelis, A; Papanikolaou, K; Sharma, G; Francis, J; Nair, L; Thomas, V; Venugopal, K; Cahan, A; Gilon, D; Israel, S; Korem, M; Mattucci, I; Pinto, D; Agrusta, F; Senese, A; Ragone, E; Utili, R; Cecchi, E; De, Rosa F; Forno, D; Imazio, M; Trinchero, R; Grossi, P; Lattanzio, M; Toniolo, A; Goglio, A; Raglio, A; Ravasio, V; Rizzi, M; Suter, F; Carosi, G; Magri, S; Signorini, L; Kanafani, Z; Kanj, S S; Sharif-Yakan, A; Abidin, I; Tamin, S S; Martinez, E R; Nieto, G I S; van, der Meer J T M; Chambers, S; Holland, D; Morris, A; Raymond, N; Read, K; Murdoch, D R; Dragulescu, S; Ionac, A; Mornos, C; Butkevich, O M; Chipigina, N; Kirill, O; Vadim, K; Vinogradova, T; Edathodu, J; Halim, M; Liew, Y Y; Tan, R -S; Lejko-Zupanc, T; Logar, M; Mueller-Premru, M; Commerford, P; Commerford, A; Deetlefs, E; Hansa, C; Ntsekhe, M; Almela, M; Armero, Y; Azqueta, M; Castaneda, X; Cervera, C; Falces, C; Garcia-dela-Maria, C; Fita, G; Gatell, J M; Heras, M; Llopis, J; Marco, F; Mestres, C A; Miro, J M; Moreno, A; Ninot, S; Pare, C; Ramirez, J; Rovira, I; Sitges, M; Anguera, I; Font, B; Guma, J R; Bermejo, J; Bouza, E; Fernandez, M A G; Gonzalez-Ramallo, V; Marin, M; Munoz, P; Pedromingo, M; Roda, J; Rodriguez-Creixems, M; Solis, J; Almirante, B; Tornos, P; de, Alarcon A; Parra, R; Alestig, E; Johansson, M; Olaison, L; Snygg-Martin, U; Pachirat, O; Pachirat, P; Pussadhamma, B; Senthong, V; Casey, A; Elliott, T; Lambert, P; Watkin, R; Eyton, C; Klein, J L; Bradley, S; Kauffman, C; Bedimo, R; Corey, G R; Crowley, A L; Douglas, P; Drew, L; Fowler, V G; Holland, T; Lalani, T; Samad, Z; Sexton, D J; Stryjewski, M; Woods, C W; Lerakis, S; Cantey, R; Steed, L; Wray, D; Dickerman, S A; Bonilla, H; DiPersio, J; Salstrom, S -J; Baddley, J; Patel, M; Peterson, G; Stancoven, A; Levine, D; Riddle, J; Rybak, M; Cabell, C H; Baloch, K; Dixon, C C; Harding, T; Jones-Richmond, M; Sanderford, B; Stafford, J; Anstrom, K; Bayer, A S; Karchmer, A W; Durack, D T; Eykyn, S; Moreillon, P
Background-Use of surgery for the treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) as related to surgical indications and operative risk for mortality has not been well defined. Methods and Results-The International Collaboration on Endocarditis-PLUS (ICE-PLUS) is a prospective cohort of consecutively enrolled patients with definite IE from 29 centers in 16 countries. We included patients from ICE-PLUS with definite left-sided, non-cardiac device-related IE who were enrolled between September 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012. A total of 1296 patients with left-sided IE were included. Surgical treatment was performed in 57% of the overall cohort and in 76% of patients with a surgical indication. Reasons for nonsurgical treatment included poor prognosis (33.7%), hemodynamic instability (19.8%), death before surgery (23.3%), stroke (22.7%), and sepsis (21%). Among patients with a surgical indication, surgical treatment was independently associated with the presence of severe aortic regurgitation, abscess, embolization before surgical treatment, and transfer from an outside hospital. Variables associated with nonsurgical treatment were a history of moderate/severe liver disease, stroke before surgical decision, and Staphyloccus aureus etiology. The integration of surgical indication, Society of Thoracic Surgeons IE score, and use of surgery was associated with 6-month survival in IE. Conclusions-Surgical decision making in IE is largely consistent with established guidelines, although nearly one quarter of patients with surgical indications do not undergo surgery. Operative risk assessment by Society of Thoracic Surgeons IE score provides prognostic information for survival beyond the operative period. S aureus IE was significantly associated with nonsurgical management.
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EMBASE:603858735
ISSN: 0009-7322
CID: 4984472