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466


THAWING CRYOPRESERVED OOCYTES: GENETIC SCREENING OF THAWED OOCYTES AND ONGOING PREGNANCY SUCCESS RATE. [Meeting Abstract]

Kramer, YG; Goldman, KN; Hodes-Wertz, B; Buldo-Licciardi, J; McCulloh, DH; Grifo, JA
ISI:000342500201321
ISSN: 1556-5653
CID: 1317832

ADVANCED PATERNAL AGE DOES NOT AFFECT EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT IN PREIMPLANTATION GENETIC SCREENING CYCLES [Meeting Abstract]

Morin, S; Hodes-Wertz, B; Grifo, J
ISI:000342500201384
ISSN: 1556-5653
CID: 1317842

QUESTIONING THE UNIVERSALITY OF THE ANEUPLOIDY PREDICTION MODEL [Meeting Abstract]

McCulloh, DH; Kramer, Y; Kofinas, J; Melzer-Ross, K; McCaffrey, C; Buldo-Licciardi, J; Noyes, N; Grifo, JA
ISI:000342500200510
ISSN: 1556-5653
CID: 1318072

LIVE BIRTHS AND ONGOING PREGNANCIES AFTER THAWED EUPLOID EMBRYO TRANSFER IN WOMEN 40 TO 43. [Meeting Abstract]

Lee, H-L; McCulloh, DH; Adler, A; Lee, T-L; Hodes-Wertz, B; Grifo, J
ISI:000342500200545
ISSN: 1556-5653
CID: 1318082

COMPARING ROUTES OF PROGESTERONE (P) FOR LUTEAL SUPPORT IN DONOR-OOCYTE RECIPIENTS (DER) FOLLOWING FRESH EMBRYOTRANSFER (ET). [Meeting Abstract]

Makhijani, RB; Goldman, KN; Buldo-Licciardi, J; McCulloh, DH; Grifo, JA; Licciardi, F
ISI:000342500201048
ISSN: 1556-5653
CID: 1318092

Assessing morphokinetic parameters via time lapse microscopy (TLM) to predict euploidy: are aneuploidy risk classification models universal?

Kramer, Yael G; Kofinas, Jason D; Melzer, Katherine; Noyes, Nicole; McCaffrey, Caroline; Buldo-Licciardi, Julia; McCulloh, David H; Grifo, James A
PURPOSE: To determine if Aneuploidy Risk Classification Models are predictive of euploidy/aneuploidy amongst IVF facilities. METHODS: We retrospectively applied key time lapse imaging events of embryos (Campbell et al.[5, 6]) to stratify embryos into 3 groups: low, medium and high risk of aneuploidy. The actual ploidy results (from array comparative genomic hybridization) were compared with expectations [5, 6]. Sources of variability in morphokinetic parameters were determined using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: The model failed to segregate euploid embryos from aneuploid embryos cultured at our facility. Further analysis indicated that the variability of embryos among patients was too great to allow selection of euploid embryos based on simple morphokinetic thresholds. Clinical selection of embryos based on morphokinetics alone is unlikely to identify euploid embryos accurately for transfer or yield higher rates of live delivery. CONCLUSIONS: The use of non-invasive morphokinetics is unlikely to discriminate aneuploid from euploid embryos. Further, it does not approach the accuracy of preimplantation genetic screening with array comparative genomic hybridization.
PMCID:4156952
PMID: 24962789
ISSN: 1058-0468
CID: 1051202

The practice of in vitro fertilization according to the published literature [Editorial]

Grifo, Jamie; Kofinas, Jason; Schoolcraft, William B
PMID: 25030707
ISSN: 0015-0282
CID: 1173562

Clinical utilisation of a rapid low-pass whole genome sequencing technique for the diagnosis of aneuploidy in human embryos prior to implantation

Wells, Dagan; Kaur, Kulvinder; Grifo, Jamie; Glassner, Michael; Taylor, Jenny C; Fragouli, Elpida; Munne, Santiago
BACKGROUND:The majority of human embryos created using in vitro fertilisation (IVF) techniques are aneuploid. Comprehensive chromosome screening methods, applicable to single cells biopsied from preimplantation embryos, allow reliable identification and transfer of euploid embryos. Recently, randomised trials using such methods have indicated that aneuploidy screening improves IVF success rates. However, the high cost of testing has restricted the availability of this potentially beneficial strategy. This study aimed to harness next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with the intention of lowering the costs of preimplantation aneuploidy screening. METHODS:Embryo biopsy, whole genome amplification and semiconductor sequencing. RESULTS:A rapid (<15 h) NGS protocol was developed, with consumable cost only two-thirds that of the most widely used method for embryo aneuploidy detection. Validation involved blinded analysis of 54 cells from cell lines or biopsies from human embryos. Sensitivity and specificity were 100%. The method was applied clinically, assisting in the selection of euploid embryos in two IVF cycles, producing healthy children in both cases. The NGS approach was also able to reveal specified mutations in the nuclear or mitochondrial genomes in parallel with chromosome assessment. Interestingly, elevated mitochondrial DNA content was associated with aneuploidy (p<0.05), a finding suggestive of a link between mitochondria and chromosomal malsegregation. CONCLUSIONS:This study demonstrates that NGS provides highly accurate, low-cost diagnosis of aneuploidy in cells from human preimplantation embryos and is rapid enough to allow testing without embryo cryopreservation. The method described also has the potential to shed light on other aspects of embryo genetics of relevance to health and viability.
PMCID:4112454
PMID: 25031024
ISSN: 1468-6244
CID: 2912262

Live birth in a 46 year old using autologous oocytes cryopreserved for a duration of 3 years: a case report documenting fertility preservation at an advanced reproductive age

Maxwell, Susan M; Goldman, Kara N; Labella, Patty A; McCaffrey, Caroline; Noyes, Nicole L; Grifo, James
PMCID:4048381
PMID: 24610096
ISSN: 1058-0468
CID: 952132

A greater number of euploid blastocysts in a given cohort predicts excellent outcomes in single embryo transfer cycles

Morin, Scott; Melzer-Ross, Katherine; McCulloh, David; Grifo, Jamie; Munne, Santiago
PURPOSE: This multicentered retrospective study analyzed whether the quantity of euploid blastocysts in a given cohort after comprehensive chromosomal screening can be used to identify candidates for single embryo transfer. METHODS: Blastocysts from 437 patients underwent trophectoderm biopsy followed by array comparative genomic hybridization. Embryos were then selected for single or double embryo transfer. The number of euploid blastocysts produced and transferred for each patient was recorded, as was clinical pregnancy rate and multiple gestation rate. RESULTS: In patients with /= 4 euploid blastocysts, clinical pregnancy rate was not reduced with single embryo transfer was performed, whereas the multiple gestation rate was greatly reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Size of the euploid embryo cohort is a marker for success in single embryo transfer cycles. Patients who produce at least four euploid blastocysts are outstanding candidates for single embryo transer.
PMCID:4048376
PMID: 24659020
ISSN: 1058-0468
CID: 1103072