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Stop the Bleed: A Prospective Evaluation and Comparison of Tourniquet Application in Security Personnel Versus Civilian Population

Petrone, Patrizio; Baltazar, Gerard; Jacquez, Ricardo A; Akerman, Meredith; Brathwaite, Collin E M; Joseph, D'Andrea K
INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND:Stop the Bleed (STB) is a national training program aiming to decrease the mortality associated with life-threatening bleeding due to injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and confidence level of security personnel placing a tourniquet (TQ) compared to civilians. METHODS:Pre and post questionnaires were shared with security personnel (Group 1) and civilians (Group 2). Both groups were assessed to determine comfort level with TQ placement. Time and success rate for placement was recorded pre- and post-STB training. A generalized linear mixed model or generalized estimating equations was used to compare pre and post measurements. RESULTS:There were 234 subjects enrolled. There was a statistically significant improvement between the pre- and post-training responses in both groups with respect to comfort level in placing a TQ. Participants also demonstrated increased familiarity with the anatomy and bleeding control after STB training. A higher successful TQ placement was obtained in both groups after STB training (Pre-training: Group 1 [17.4%], Group 2 [12.8%]; Post-training: Group 1 [94.8%], Group 2 [92.3%]). Both groups demonstrated improved time to TA placement with a longer mean time improvement achieved in Group 1. Although the time to TQ placement pre-and post-training was statistically significant, we found that the post-training times between Groups 1 and 2 were similar (P = .983). CONCLUSIONS:Participants improved their confidence level with the use of hemorrhage control techniques and dramatically increased the rate and time to successful placement of a TQ. While civilians had the greatest increase in comfort level, the security personnel group saw the most significant reduction in the time to successful TQ placement. These findings highlight the critical role of STB in educating and empowering both civilians and security personnel in bleeding control techniques.
PMID: 35567282
ISSN: 1555-9823
CID: 5215142

Stop the Bleed: A Prospective Evaluation and Comparison of Tourniquet Application in Security Personnel vs Civilian Population [Meeting Abstract]

Petrone, P; Baltazar, G A; Jacquez, R A; Akerman, M; Brathwaite, C E M; Joseph, D K
Introduction: Stop the Bleed (STB) is a national training program aiming to decrease the mortality associated with life-threatening bleeding due to injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and confidence level of security personnel placing a tourniquet (TQ) compared to civilians.
Method(s): Pre and post questionnaires were shared with security personnel (Group 1), and civilians (Group 2). Both groups were assessed to determine comfort level with TQ placement. Time and success rate for placement was recorded pre- and post-STB training. A generalized linear mixed model or generalized estimating equations were used.
Result(s): 234 subjects were enrolled. There was a statistically significant improvement between the pre- and post-training responses in both groups with respect to comfort level in TQ placing. Participants also demonstrated increased familiarity with the anatomy and bleeding control after being trained. A higher successful tourniquet placement was obtained in both groups after training (Pre-training: Group-1[17.4%], Group-2[12.8%], Post-training: Group-1[94.8%], Group-2[92.3%]). Both groups demonstrated improved time to placement with a longer mean time improvement achieved in Group 1. Although the time to TQ placement pre-and post-training was statistically significant, we found that the post-training times between groups 1 and 2 were similar (p=0.983).
Conclusion(s): Participants improved their confidence level and dramatically increased the rate and time to successful TQ placement. While civilians had the greatest increase in comfort level, the security personnel group saw the most significant reduction in the time to successful placement. These findings highlight the critical role of STB in bleeding control techniques.
Copyright
EMBASE:2014926820
ISSN: 1879-1190
CID: 5024632

Management of mass casualties due to COVID-19: handling the dead

Petrone, Patrizio; Joseph, D'Andrea K; Jacquez, Ricardo A; Baltazar, Gerard A; Brathwaite, Collin E M
A high number of fatalities can occur during major disasters or during events like the COVID-19 pandemic. In a natural disaster, the dead must be removed from disaster sites while rescue work is in progress; otherwise, the health and safety of the community are threatened. The COVID-19 pandemic is analogous to a natural disaster with mass casualties where the disaster sites are hospitals with morgues that are overwhelmed. As the number of the deceased rise rapidly and hospital morgues are at their full capacity, hospitals use what is called a Body Collection Point (BCP). BCP is defined as a temporary refrigeration unit used to store decedents until transport is arranged. Decedents should always be handled in a manner denoting respect, and provisions and management of resources should be properly mobilized to ensure this. Contingency plans must be created to prepare for worsening of the disaster that further overwhelms the capacity of the health care systems.
PMCID:8178665
PMID: 34089336
ISSN: 1863-9941
CID: 4899342

Overnight Intubation in Glasgow Coma Scale Depressed Trauma Patients: Are We Helping or Harming? [Meeting Abstract]

de Roulet, Amory C.; Maizlin, Ilan I.; Jacquez, Ricardo A.; Zimmerman, Mary Ellen; Coomaraswamy, Michael; Hagler, Daniel J.; Kopp, Miroslav; Saldinger, Pierre F.; Sample, Jason M.
ISI:000447772500581
ISSN: 1072-7515
CID: 4598422