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Perspectives and institutional policies on patient safety and image quality regarding the use of knee-spanning external fixators in MRI: A survey study of the Society of Skeletal Radiology

Marcel, Aaron J; Alaia, Erin F; Alaia, Michael J; Katz, Lee D; Medvecky, Michael J; Porrino, Jack
OBJECTIVE:Concerns regarding patient safety and image quality have made the use of knee-spanning external fixators in MRI a challenging clinical scenario. The purpose of our study was to poll practicing musculoskeletal radiologists on their personal experiences regarding the use of knee-spanning external fixators in MRI in an effort to consolidate practice trends for the radiologists' benefit. METHODS:A 27-item survey was created to address the institutional use, safety, adverse events, quality, and perspectives of the radiologist related to MRI of an externally fixated knee. The survey was distributed to 1739 members of the Society of Skeletal Radiology. RESULTS:A total of 72 members of the Society of Skeletal Radiology completed the survey. Most notably, 40 of 72 (55.56%) respondents are permitted to place a knee-spanning external fixator inside the MR bore at their institution, while19 of 72 (26.39%) respondents are not permitted to do so. Fourteen of 32 (43.75%) respondents have institutional guidelines for safely performing an MRI of an externally fixated knee. Twenty-five of 32 (78.13%) respondents are comfortable permitting an MRI of an externally fixated knee. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:We found a general lack of consensus regarding the decision to scan a patient with a knee-spanning external fixator in MRI. Many institutions lack safety guidelines, and providers rely upon a heterogeneous breadth of resources for safety information. A re-examination of the FDA device labeling nomenclature and expectations of the individual manufacturers may be needed to bridge this gap and help direct management decisions placed upon the provider.
PMID: 37695343
ISSN: 1432-2161
CID: 5593642

Psychological Readiness to Return to Sport (RTS) and RTS Rates Are Similar in Patients After Either Bilateral or Unilateral Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Buldo-Licciardi, Michael; Rynecki, Nicole D.; Rao, Naina; Eskenazi, Jordan; Montgomery, Samuel R.; Li, Zachary I.; Moore, Michael; Alaia, Michael J.; Strauss, Eric J.; Jazrawi, Laith M.; Campbell, Kirk A.
Purpose: To compare psychological readiness to return to sport (RTS), RTS rate, level of return, and time to return between patients who underwent bilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) and those who underwent unilateral ACLR. Methods: The electronic medical record at a single academic medical center was queried for patients who underwent ACLR from January 2012 to May 2020. The inclusion criteria were skeletally mature patients who underwent either single or sequential bilateral ACLR and who had undergone either the primary ACLR or second contralateral ACLR at least 2 years earlier. Bilateral ACLRs were matched 1:3 to unilateral reconstructions based on age, sex, and body mass index. Psychological readiness to RTS was assessed using the validated ACL Return to Sport After Injury (ACL-RSI) scale. This, along with time to return and level of RTS, was compared between the 2 cohorts. Results: In total, 170 patients were included, of whom 44 underwent bilateral ACLR and 132 underwent unilateral ACLR. At the time of the first surgical procedure, patients in the unilateral cohort were aged 28.8 ± 9.4 years and those in the bilateral cohort were aged 25.7 ± 9.8 years (P = .06). The average time difference between the first and second surgical procedures was 28.4 ± 22.3 months. There was no difference in psychological readiness to RTS (50.5 in bilateral cohort vs 48.1 in unilateral cohort, P = .66), RTS rate (78.0% in unilateral cohort vs 65.9% in bilateral cohort, P = .16), percentage of return to preinjury sport level (61.2% in unilateral cohort vs 69.0% in bilateral cohort, P = .21), or time to return (41.2 ± 29.3 weeks in unilateral cohort vs 35.2 ± 23.7 weeks in bilateral cohort, P = .31) between the 2 cohorts. Conclusions: Compared with patients who undergo unilateral ACLR, patients who undergo bilateral ACLR are equally as psychologically ready to RTS, showing equal rates of RTS, time to return, and level of return. Level of Evidence: Level III, retrospective cohort study.
SCOPUS:85179484324
ISSN: 2666-061x
CID: 5620732

Increased kinesiophobia leads to lower return to sport rate and clinical outcomes following osteochondral allograft transplantation of the knee

Triana, Jairo; DeClouette, Brittany; Montgomery, Samuel R; Avila, Amanda; Shankar, Dhruv S; Alaia, Michael J; Strauss, Eric J; Campbell, Kirk A
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE:The purpose of this study is to describe the postoperative psychological state of patients following osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in the knee and to determine whether patient-perceived kinesiophobia is associated with the rate of return to sport (RTS). METHODS:A retrospective review of the electronic medical record at a single institution was conducted for all patients that underwent OCA transplantation from January 2010 to 2020. Patient-reported outcomes including the visual analog scale (VAS), knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and the Tampa scale of kinesiophobia-11 (TSK-11) were collected. Patients were surveyed regarding their postoperative RTS status. RESULTS:A total of 38 patients (52.6% female) were included in our analysis. Overall, 24 patients (63.2%) returned to sport with 12 (50%) of these patients returning at a lower level of play. When comparing patients that return to sport to those that did not, patients that return had significantly superior KOOS pain (p = 0.019) and KOOS QOL (p = 0.011). Measures of kinesiophobia (TSK-11) were significantly higher among patients that did not return to sport (p = 0.014), while satisfaction (n.s.) and pain intensity (n.s.) were comparable between groups. Logistic regression models controlling for demographic factors, VAS pain scores and lesion size showed that for every one-point increase in TSK-11 kinesiophobia score, patients were 1.33 times more likely to return to sport at a lower level (p = 0.009). For every one-point increase in TSK-11 scores KOOS QOL decreased by 2.4 points (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:Fear of reinjury decreases the likelihood that patients will return to their preoperative level of sport after OCA transplantation. Patients that do not return to sport report significantly greater fear of reinjury and inferior clinical outcomes, despite similar levels of satisfaction and pain compared to those that return. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE/METHODS:Level III.
PMID: 38294055
ISSN: 1433-7347
CID: 5627612

Cannabidiol for Postoperative Pain Control After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Demonstrates No Deficits in Patient-Reported Outcomes Versus Placebo: 1-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

Alaia, Michael J; Li, Zachary I; Chalem, Isabel; Hurley, Eoghan T; Vasavada, Kinjal; Gonzalez-Lomas, Guillem; Rokito, Andrew S; Jazrawi, Laith M; Kaplan, Kevin
BACKGROUND/UNASSIGNED:Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown recently to positively affect patient pain and satisfaction immediately after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). However, it is unclear whether the addition of CBD to a perioperative regimen could affect postoperative outcomes. PURPOSE/UNASSIGNED:To evaluate patient-reported outcomes among patients who underwent ARCR and received buccally absorbed CBD or an identical placebo for early postoperative pain management at 1-year follow-up. STUDY DESIGN/UNASSIGNED:Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. METHODS/UNASSIGNED:test and Fisher exact test, respectively. RESULTS/UNASSIGNED: = .79). CONCLUSION/UNASSIGNED:Perioperative use of CBD for pain control among patients undergoing ARCR did not result in any significant deficits in pain, satisfaction, or patient-reported outcomes at 1-year postoperatively compared with a placebo control group. These findings suggest that CBD can be considered in a postoperative multimodal pain management regimen without detrimental effects on outcome. REGISTRATION/UNASSIGNED:NCT04672252 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier).
PMCID:10846110
PMID: 38322981
ISSN: 2325-9671
CID: 5632632

Patients who undergo tibial tubercle anteromedialization with medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction demonstrate similar rates of return to sport compared to isolated MPFL reconstruction

Li, Zachary I; Garra, Sharif; Eskenazi, Jordan; Montgomery, Samuel R; Triana, Jairo; Hughes, Andrew J; Alaia, Michael J; Strauss, Eric J; Jazrawi, Laith M; Campbell, Kirk A
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE:To investigate the rate of return to sports and sport psychological readiness between patients who underwent isolated MPFLR (iMPFLR) compared to a matched cohort of patients who underwent MPFLR with anteromedializing tibial tubercle osteotomy (MPFLR/TTO). METHODS:Patients who underwent primary MPFLR with or without TTO for recurrent patellar instability were retrospectively reviewed from 2012 to 2020 at a single institution. Preinjury sport and work information, Kujala, Tegner, Visual Analogue Score for pain, satisfaction and MPFL-Return to Sport after Injury (MPFL-RSI) score were collected. Two readers independently measured the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, Caton-Deschamps index and Dejour classification for trochlear dysplasia. Patients in iMPFLR and MPFLR/TTO groups were matched 1:1 on age, sex, body mass index and follow-up length. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to determine whether the MPFL-RSI was associated with a return to sport. RESULTS:This study included 74 patients at mean follow-up of 52.5 months (range: 24-117). These groups returned to sport at similar rates (iMPFLR: 67.6%, MPFLR/TTO: 73.0%, not significant [ns]), though iMPFLR patients returned more quickly (8.4 vs. 12.8 months, p = 0.019). Rates of return to preinjury sport level were also similar (45.9% vs. 40.5%, ns). Patients with Dejour B/C took more time to return to sport compared to patients with mild/no trochlear pathology (13.8 vs. 7.9 months, p = 0.003). Increasing MPFL-RSI score was significantly predictive of the overall return to sport (odds ratio [OR]: 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.03, 1.13], p < 0.001) and return to preinjury level (OR: 1.07, 95% CI [1.04, 1.13], p < 0.001). Most patients in iMPFLR and MPFLR/TTO groups resumed work (95.7% vs. 88.5%, ns), though iMPFLR patients who returned to preinjury work levels did so more quickly (1.7 vs. 4.6 months, p = 0.005). CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:Patients who underwent MPFLR with anteromedializing TTO demonstrated similar rates of return to sport and psychological readiness compared to an isolated MPFLR matched comparison group, though iMPFLRs returned more quickly. Patients with more severe trochlear pathology required more time to return to sports. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE/METHODS:Level III.
PMID: 38270287
ISSN: 1433-7347
CID: 5625202

High Rate of Patient Satisfaction with Either Telemedicine or Traditional Office-Based Follow-Up Visit After Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery

Markus, Danielle H; Colasanti, Christopher A; Kaplan, Daniel J; Manjunath, Amit K; Alaia, Michael J; Strauss, Eric J; Jazrawi, Laith M; Campbell, Kirk A
PMID: 37318834
ISSN: 1556-3669
CID: 5605762

Patient-reported outcomes and return to pre-injury activities after surgical treatment of multi-ligamentous knee injuries in patients over 40-years-old: Average 5-years follow-up

Li, Zachary I; Green, Joshua S; Chalem, Isabel; Triana, Jairo; Rao, Naina; Hughes, Andrew J; Campbell, Kirk A; Jazrawi, Laith M; Medvecky, Michael J; Alaia, Michael J
BACKGROUND:Multi-ligamentous knee injuries (MLKI) are potentially devastating injuries, though existing prognostic research among older patients who sustain MLKI is limited. The purpose was to investigate clinical outcomes and rates of return to pre-injury activities following surgical treatment of MLKI in patients at least 40 years old. METHODS:This study was a multi-center retrospective case series of patients who underwent surgical treatment for MLKI from 2013-2020 and were ≥ 40 years old at time of injury. Outcomes were assessed via e-mail and telephone using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Lysholm score, Tegner activity scale, a satisfaction rating, and return to pre-injury sport and work surveys. Stepwise linear regression was used to assess the impact of preoperative characteristics on IKDC and Lysholm scores. RESULTS:Of 45 patients eligible for inclusion, 33 patients (mean age: 48.6 years [range: 40-72]) were assessed at a mean follow-up of 59.1 months (range 24-133). The cohort reported a mean IKDC of 63.4 ± 23.5, Lysholm of 72.6 ± 23.6, and Tegner of 3.8 ± 2.0. There was a 41.2% rate of return to sports, and 82.1% returned to work. Documented knee dislocation was predictive of poorer IKDC (β:-20.05, p = 0.025) and Lysholm (β:-19.99, p = 0.030). Patients aged > 50 were more satisfied compared to those 40-50 years old (96.2 ± 4.9 vs 75.6 ± 23.3, p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS:Patients who sustained MLKI aged at least 40 at injury demonstrated fair clinical outcomes at a mean 5-year follow-up. Older patients who sustained MLKI reported a relatively high rate of return to work but were less likely to return to sports. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE/METHODS:IV, Case series.
PMID: 38070381
ISSN: 1873-5800
CID: 5589802

Acceptable clinical outcomes despite high reoperation rate at minimum 12-month follow-up after concomitant arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and medial meniscal allograft transplantation

Shankar, Dhruv S.; Vasavada, Kinjal D.; Avila, Amanda; DeClouette, Brittany; Aziz, Hadi; Strauss, Eric J.; Alaia, Michael J.; Jazrawi, Laith M.; Gonzalez-Lomas, Guillem; Campbell, Kirk A.
Background: Single-stage medial meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is a technically challenging procedure for management of knee pain and instability in younger patients, but clinical and functional outcomes data are sparse. The purpose of this study was to assess surgical and patient-reported outcomes following concomitant ACLR and medial MAT. Methods: We conducted a retrospective case series of patients who underwent medial MAT with concomitant primary or revision ACLR at our institution from 2010 to 2021 and had minimum 12-month follow-up. Complications, reoperations, visual analog scale (VAS) pain, satisfaction, Lysholm score, return to sport, and return to work outcomes were assessed. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pain Interference, Pain Intensity, and Physical Function Scores were used to measure patients"™ functional status relative to the US population. P-values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: The cohort consisted of 17 knees of 16 individual patients. The cohort was majority male (82.4%) with mean age of 31.9 years (range 19"“49 years) and mean body mass index (BMI) of 27.9 kg/m2 (range 22.5"“53.3 kg/m2). Mean follow-up time was 56.8 months (range 13"“106 months). Most patients underwent revision ACLR (64.7%). The 1-year reoperation rate was high (23.5%), with two patients (11.8%) tearing their meniscus graft. Patient-reported outcomes indicated low VAS pain (mean 2.2), high satisfaction (mean 77.9%), and fair Lysholm score (mean 81.1). Return to work rate was high (92.9%), while return to sport rate was low (42.9%). Postoperative PROMIS scores were comparable or superior to the national average and correlated significantly with patient satisfaction (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The concomitant ACLR and MAT procedure is associated with excellent knee pain and functional outcomes and high rate of return to work after surgery, though the 1-year reoperation rate is high and rate of return to sport is low. Level of evidence: IV.
SCOPUS:85146131298
ISSN: 2234-0726
CID: 5408462

A modified Delphi consensus statement on patellar instability: part II

Hurley, Eoghan T; Sherman, Seth L; Chahla, Jorge; Gursoy, Safa; Alaia, Michael J; Tanaka, Miho J; Pace, J L; Jazrawi, Laith M; ,; Hughes, Andrew J; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Bassett, Ashley J; Bonner, Kevin F; Camp, Christopher L; Campbell, Kirk A; Carter, Cordelia W; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Dejour, David; Edgar, Cory M; Erickson, Brandon J; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Farr, Jack; Farrow, Lutul D; Frank, Rachel M; Freedman, Kevin B; Fulkerson, John P; Getgood, Alan; Gomoll, Andreas H; Grant, John A; Gwathmey, F W; Haddad, Fares S; Hiemstra, Laurie A; Hinckel, Betina B; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Koh, Jason L; Krych, Aaron J; LaPrade, Robert F; Li, Zachary I; Logan, Catherine A; Gonzalez-Lomas, Guillem; Mannino, Brian J; Lind, Martin; Matache, Bogdan A; Matzkin, Elizabeth; Mandelbaum, Bert; McCarthy, Thomas F; Mulcahey, Mary; Musahl, Volker; Neyret, Philippe; Nuelle, Clayton W; Oussedik, Sam; Verdonk, Peter; Rodeo, Scott A; Rowan, Fiachra E; Salzler, Matthew J; Schottel, Patrick C; Shannon, Fintan J; Sheean, Andrew J; Strickland, Sabrina M; Waterman, Brian R; Wittstein, Jocelyn R; Zacchilli, Michael; Zaffagnini, Stefano
AIMS/UNASSIGNED:The aim of this study was to establish consensus statements on medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction, anteromedialization tibial tubercle osteotomy, trochleoplasty, and rehabilitation and return to sporting activity in patients with patellar instability, using the modified Delphi process. METHODS/UNASSIGNED:This was the second part of a study dealing with these aspects of management in these patients. As in part I, a total of 60 surgeons from 11 countries contributed to the development of consensus statements based on their expertise in this area. They were assigned to one of seven working groups defined by subtopics of interest. Consensus was defined as achieving between 80% and 89% agreement, strong consensus was defined as between 90% and 99% agreement, and 100% agreement was considered unanimous. RESULTS/UNASSIGNED:Of 41 questions and statements on patellar instability, none achieved unanimous consensus, 19 achieved strong consensus, 15 achieved consensus, and seven did not achieve consensus. CONCLUSION/UNASSIGNED:Most statements reached some degree of consensus, without any achieving unanimous consensus. There was no consensus on the use of anchors in MPFL reconstruction, and the order of fixation of the graft (patella first versus femur first). There was also no consensus on the indications for trochleoplasty or its effect on the viability of the cartilage after elevation of the osteochondral flap. There was also no consensus on postoperative immobilization or weightbearing, or whether paediatric patients should avoid an early return to sport.
PMID: 38035602
ISSN: 2049-4408
CID: 5590422

A modified Delphi consensus statement on patellar instability: part I

Hurley, Eoghan T; Hughes, Andrew J; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Dejour, David; Campbell, Kirk A; Mulcahey, Mary K; Wittstein, Jocelyn R; Jazrawi, Laith M; ,; Alaia, Michael J; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Bassett, Ashley J; Bonner, Kevin F; Camp, Christopher L; Carter, Cordelia W; Chahla, Jorge; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Edgar, Cory M; Erickson, Brandon J; Espregueira-Mendes, João; Farr, Jack; Farrow, Lutul D; Frank, Rachel M; Freedman, Kevin B; Fulkerson, John P; Getgood, Alan; Gomoll, Andreas H; Grant, John A; Gursoy, Safa; Gwathmey, F W; Haddad, Fares S; Hiemstra, Laurie A; Hinckel, Betina B; Koh, Jason L; Krych, Aaron J; LaPrade, Robert F; Li, Zachary I; Logan, Catherine A; Gonzalez-Lomas, Guillem; Mannino, Brian J; Lind, Martin; Matache, Bogdan A; Matzkin, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Thomas F; Mandelbaum, Bert; Musahl, Volker; Neyret, Philippe; Nuelle, Clayton W; Oussedik, Sam; Pace, J L; Verdonk, Peter; Rodeo, Scott A; Rowan, Fiachra E; Salzler, Matthew J; Schottel, Patrick C; Shannon, Fintan J; Sheean, Andrew J; Sherman, Seth L; Strickland, Sabrina M; Tanaka, Miho J; Waterman, Brian R; Zacchilli, Michael; Zaffagnini, Stefano
AIMS/UNASSIGNED:The aim of this study was to establish consensus statements on the diagnosis, nonoperative management, and indications, if any, for medial patellofemoral complex (MPFC) repair in patients with patellar instability, using the modified Delphi approach. METHODS/UNASSIGNED:A total of 60 surgeons from 11 countries were invited to develop consensus statements based on their expertise in this area. They were assigned to one of seven working groups defined by subtopics of interest within patellar instability. Consensus was defined as achieving between 80% and 89% agreement, strong consensus was defined as between 90% and 99% agreement, and 100% agreement was considered to be unanimous. RESULTS/UNASSIGNED:Of 27 questions and statements on patellar instability, three achieved unanimous consensus, 14 achieved strong consensus, five achieved consensus, and five did not achieve consensus. CONCLUSION/UNASSIGNED:The statements that reached unanimous consensus were that an assessment of physeal status is critical for paediatric patients with patellar instability. There was also unanimous consensus on early mobilization and resistance training following nonoperative management once there is no apprehension. The statements that did not achieve consensus were on the importance of immobilization of the knee, the use of orthobiologics in nonoperative management, the indications for MPFC repair, and whether a vastus medialis oblique advancement should be performed.
PMID: 38037678
ISSN: 2049-4408
CID: 5590442