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Automated interpretable discovery of heterogeneous treatment effectiveness: A COVID-19 case study

Lengerich, Benjamin J; Nunnally, Mark E; Aphinyanaphongs, Yin; Ellington, Caleb; Caruana, Rich
Testing multiple treatments for heterogeneous (varying) effectiveness with respect to many underlying risk factors requires many pairwise tests; we would like to instead automatically discover and visualize patient archetypes and predictors of treatment effectiveness using multitask machine learning. In this paper, we present a method to estimate these heterogeneous treatment effects with an interpretable hierarchical framework that uses additive models to visualize expected treatment benefits as a function of patient factors (identifying personalized treatment benefits) and concurrent treatments (identifying combinatorial treatment benefits). This method achieves state-of-the-art predictive power for COVID-19 in-hospital mortality and interpretable identification of heterogeneous treatment benefits. We first validate this method on the large public MIMIC-IV dataset of ICU patients to test recovery of heterogeneous treatment effects. Next we apply this method to a proprietary dataset of over 3000 patients hospitalized for COVID-19, and find evidence of heterogeneous treatment effectiveness predicted largely by indicators of inflammation and thrombosis risk: patients with few indicators of thrombosis risk benefit most from treatments against inflammation, while patients with few indicators of inflammation risk benefit most from treatments against thrombosis. This approach provides an automated methodology to discover heterogeneous and individualized effectiveness of treatments.
PMCID:9055753
PMID: 35504543
ISSN: 1532-0480
CID: 5216082

Anxiety, worry, and job satisfaction: effects of COVID-19 care on critical care anesthesiologists [Letter]

Siddiqui, Shahla; Tung, Avery; Kelly, Lauren; Nurok, Michael; Khanna, Ashish K; Ben-Jacob, Talia; Verdiner, Ricardo; Sreedharan, Roshni; Novack, Lena; Nunnally, Mark; Chow, Jarva; Williams, George W; Sladen, Robert N
PMCID:8756752
PMID: 35025026
ISSN: 1496-8975
CID: 5118922

An Interprofessional Approach to Preventing Tracheostomy-Related Pressure Injuries

Urquhart, Anne E; Savage, Elizabeth; Danziger, Keri; Easter, Tara; Terala, Anish; Nunnally, Mark
OBJECTIVE:An interprofessional team, also known as the tracheostomy steering committee (TSC) was established to prevent tracheotomy-related pressure injuries (TRPI) and standardize practice for tracheostomy insertion and care of patients with tracheostomies. In addition to reducing the number TRPIs, the TSC sought establish an escalation process for all clinicians to raise concerns about the care and management of patients with tracheostomies. METHODS:This quality improvement initiative used the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control) framework with a pre- and post-intervention design. The patient population included all adult patients requiring a tracheostomy. The TSC created a TRPI-prevention bundle, which included recommendations for protective foam dressing and skin barrier film, suture tension, timing of suture removal, stoma care, offloading and positioning, escalation, documentation, and dual skin assessment. An electronic tracheostomy report was developed to track patients with a tracheostomy across the enterprise. RESULTS:A total of 289 patients had a tracheostomy during their inpatient hospital stay from January 2018 through December 2019. There was an observed a reduction in the daily rate of TRPIs by 50% with the use of the standardized TRPI-prevention bundle. CONCLUSIONS:Use of the TRPI-prevention bundle at our institution resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of TRPI. Timely escalation of possible tracheostomy injuries or tracheostomies at risk enabled rapid intervention, likely preventing many injuries, and real-time feedback to clinicians reinforced best practices. The use of an interprofessional team is necessary in providing optimal tracheostomy care to ensure the best outcomes.
PMID: 34864752
ISSN: 1538-8654
CID: 5110032

Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock 2021

Evans, Laura; Rhodes, Andrew; Alhazzani, Waleed; Antonelli, Massimo; Coopersmith, Craig M; French, Craig; Machado, Flávia R; Mcintyre, Lauralyn; Ostermann, Marlies; Prescott, Hallie C; Schorr, Christa; Simpson, Steven; Wiersinga, W Joost; Alshamsi, Fayez; Angus, Derek C; Arabi, Yaseen; Azevedo, Luciano; Beale, Richard; Beilman, Gregory; Belley-Cote, Emilie; Burry, Lisa; Cecconi, Maurizio; Centofanti, John; Coz Yataco, Angel; De Waele, Jan; Dellinger, R Phillip; Doi, Kent; Du, Bin; Estenssoro, Elisa; Ferrer, Ricard; Gomersall, Charles; Hodgson, Carol; Hylander Møller, Morten; Iwashyna, Theodore; Jacob, Shevin; Kleinpell, Ruth; Klompas, Michael; Koh, Younsuck; Kumar, Anand; Kwizera, Arthur; Lobo, Suzana; Masur, Henry; McGloughlin, Steven; Mehta, Sangeeta; Mehta, Yatin; Mer, Mervyn; Nunnally, Mark; Oczkowski, Simon; Osborn, Tiffany; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth; Perner, Anders; Puskarich, Michael; Roberts, Jason; Schweickert, William; Seckel, Maureen; Sevransky, Jonathan; Sprung, Charles L; Welte, Tobias; Zimmerman, Janice; Levy, Mitchell
PMID: 34605781
ISSN: 1530-0293
CID: 5037122

Executive Summary: Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for the Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock 2021

Evans, Laura; Rhodes, Andrew; Alhazzani, Waleed; Antonelli, Massimo; Coopersmith, Craig M; French, Craig; Machado, Flávia R; Mcintyre, Lauralyn; Ostermann, Marlies; Prescott, Hallie C; Schorr, Christa; Simpson, Steven; Joost Wiersinga, W; Alshamsi, Fayez; Angus, Derek C; Arabi, Yaseen; Azevedo, Luciano; Beale, Richard; Beilman, Gregory; Belley-Cote, Emilie; Burry, Lisa; Cecconi, Maurizio; Centofanti, John; Yataco, Angel Coz; De Waele, Jan; Dellinger, R Phillip; Doi, Kent; Du, Bin; Estenssoro, Elisa; Ferrer, Ricard; Gomersall, Charles; Hodgson, Carol; Møller, Morten Hylander; Iwashyna, Theodore; Jacob, Shevin; Kleinpell, Ruth; Klompas, Michael; Koh, Younsuck; Kumar, Anand; Kwizera, Arthur; Lobo, Suzana; Masur, Henry; McGloughlin, Steven; Mehta, Sangeeta; Mehta, Yatin; Mer, Mervyn; Nunnally, Mark; Oczkowski, Simon; Osborn, Tiffany; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth; Perner, Anders; Puskarich, Michael; Roberts, Jason; Schweickert, William; Seckel, Maureen; Sevransky, Jonathan; Sprung, Charles L; Welte, Tobias; Zimmerman, Janice; Levy, Mitchell
PMID: 34643578
ISSN: 1530-0293
CID: 5037202

Pheochromocytoma Resection in a Patient With Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension and Thrombocytopenia

Stombaugh, David Keegan; Thomas, Caroline; Dalton, Allison; Chaney, Mark A; Nunnally, Mark E; Berends, Annika M A; Kerstens, Michiel N
PMID: 33931343
ISSN: 1532-8422
CID: 4865742

Surviving sepsis campaign: international guidelines for management of sepsis and septic shock 2021

Evans, Laura; Rhodes, Andrew; Alhazzani, Waleed; Antonelli, Massimo; Coopersmith, Craig M; French, Craig; Machado, Flávia R; Mcintyre, Lauralyn; Ostermann, Marlies; Prescott, Hallie C; Schorr, Christa; Simpson, Steven; Wiersinga, W Joost; Alshamsi, Fayez; Angus, Derek C; Arabi, Yaseen; Azevedo, Luciano; Beale, Richard; Beilman, Gregory; Belley-Cote, Emilie; Burry, Lisa; Cecconi, Maurizio; Centofanti, John; Coz Yataco, Angel; De Waele, Jan; Dellinger, R Phillip; Doi, Kent; Du, Bin; Estenssoro, Elisa; Ferrer, Ricard; Gomersall, Charles; Hodgson, Carol; Møller, Morten Hylander; Iwashyna, Theodore; Jacob, Shevin; Kleinpell, Ruth; Klompas, Michael; Koh, Younsuck; Kumar, Anand; Kwizera, Arthur; Lobo, Suzana; Masur, Henry; McGloughlin, Steven; Mehta, Sangeeta; Mehta, Yatin; Mer, Mervyn; Nunnally, Mark; Oczkowski, Simon; Osborn, Tiffany; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth; Perner, Anders; Puskarich, Michael; Roberts, Jason; Schweickert, William; Seckel, Maureen; Sevransky, Jonathan; Sprung, Charles L; Welte, Tobias; Zimmerman, Janice; Levy, Mitchell
PMCID:8486643
PMID: 34599691
ISSN: 1432-1238
CID: 5037112

The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: research priorities for the administration, epidemiology, scoring and identification of sepsis

Nunnally, Mark E; Ferrer, Ricard; Martin, Greg S; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Machado, Flavia R; De Backer, Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M; Deutschman, Clifford S
OBJECTIVE:To identify priorities for administrative, epidemiologic and diagnostic research in sepsis. DESIGN/METHODS:As a follow-up to a previous consensus statement about sepsis research, members of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Research Committee, representing the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Society of Critical Care Medicine addressed six questions regarding care delivery, epidemiology, organ dysfunction, screening, identification of septic shock, and information that can predict outcomes in sepsis. METHODS:Six questions from the Scoring/Identification and Administration sections of the original Research Priorities publication were explored in greater detail to better examine the knowledge gaps and rationales for questions that were previously identified through a consensus process. RESULTS:The document provides a framework for priorities in research to address the following questions: (1) What is the optimal model of delivering sepsis care?; (2) What is the epidemiology of sepsis susceptibility and response to treatment?; (3) What information identifies organ dysfunction?; (4) How can we screen for sepsis in various settings?; (5) How do we identify septic shock?; and (6) What in-hospital clinical information is associated with important outcomes in patients with sepsis? CONCLUSIONS:There is substantial knowledge of sepsis epidemiology and ways to identify and treat sepsis patients, but many gaps remain. Areas of uncertainty identified in this manuscript can help prioritize initiatives to improve an understanding of individual patient and demographic heterogeneity with sepsis and septic shock, biomarkers and accurate patient identification, organ dysfunction, and ways to improve sepsis care.
PMID: 34212256
ISSN: 2197-425x
CID: 4927232

Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Research Priorities for Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Critical Illness

Coopersmith, Craig M; Antonelli, Massimo; Bauer, Seth R; Deutschman, Clifford S; Evans, Laura E; Ferrer, Ricard; Hellman, Judith; Jog, Sameer; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Kissoon, Niranjan; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Nunnally, Mark E; Prescott, Hallie C; Rhodes, Andrew; Talmor, Daniel; Tissieres, Pierre; De Backer, Daniel
OBJECTIVES/OBJECTIVE:To identify research priorities in the management, pathophysiology, and host response of coronavirus disease 2019 in critically ill patients. DESIGN/METHODS:The Surviving Sepsis Research Committee, a multiprofessional group of 17 international experts representing the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Society of Critical Care Medicine, was virtually convened during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The committee iteratively developed the recommendations and subsequent document. METHODS:Each committee member submitted a list of what they believed were the most important priorities for coronavirus disease 2019 research. The entire committee voted on 58 submitted questions to determine top priorities for coronavirus disease 2019 research. RESULTS:The Surviving Sepsis Research Committee provides 13 priorities for coronavirus disease 2019. Of these, the top six priorities were identified and include the following questions: 1) Should the approach to ventilator management differ from the standard approach in patients with acute hypoxic respiratory failure?, 2) Can the host response be modulated for therapeutic benefit?, 3) What specific cells are directly targeted by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, and how do these cells respond?, 4) Can early data be used to predict outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 and, by extension, to guide therapies?, 5) What is the role of prone positioning and noninvasive ventilation in nonventilated patients with coronavirus disease?, and 6) Which interventions are best to use for viral load modulation and when should they be given? CONCLUSIONS:Although knowledge of both biology and treatment has increased exponentially in the first year of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, significant knowledge gaps remain. The research priorities identified represent a roadmap for investigation in coronavirus disease 2019.
PMID: 33591008
ISSN: 1530-0293
CID: 4786622

Critical Care Medicine Practice: A Pilot Survey of US Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine-Trained Physicians

Siddiqui, Shahla; Bartels, Karsten; Schaefer, Maximilian S; Novack, Lena; Sreedharan, Roshni; Ben-Jacob, Talia K; Khanna, Ashish K; Nunnally, Mark E; Souter, Michael; Simmons, Shawn T; Williams, George
BACKGROUND:This survey assessed satisfaction with the practice environment among physicians who have completed fellowship training in critical care medicine (CCM) as recognized by the American Board of Anesthesiology (and are members of the American Society of Anesthesiology) and evaluated the perceived effectiveness of training programs in preparing fellows for critical care practice. METHODS:A cross-sectional online survey composed of 39 multiple choice and open-ended questions was administered between August and December 2018 to all members of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) who self-identified as being CCM trained. The survey instrument was developed and revised in an iterative fashion by ASA committee on CCM and the Society for Education in Anesthesia (SEA). Survey results were analyzed using a mixed-method approach. RESULTS:Three hundred fifty-three of the 1400 anesthesiologists who self-identified to the ASA as having CCM training (25.2%) completed the survey. Most were men (72.3%), board certified in CCM (98.7%), and had practiced a median of 5 years. Half of the respondents rated their training as "excellent." A total of 70.6% described currently working in academic centers with 53.6% providing care in open surgical intensive care units (ICUs). Most anesthesiologist intensivists (75%) spend at least 25% of their clinical time providing ICU care (versus clinical anesthesia). A total of 89% of the respondents were involved in educational activities, 60% reported being in administrative leadership roles, and 37% engaged in scholarly activity. Areas of dissatisfaction included fatigue, lack of collegiality or respect, lack of research training, decreased job satisfaction, and burnout. Analysis suggested moderate levels of job satisfaction (49%), work-life balance (52%), and high levels of burnout (74%). A significant contributor to burnout was with a perception of lack of respect (P = .005) in the work environment. Burnout was not significantly associated with gender or duration of practice. Qualitative analysis of the open-ended responses also identified these 3 variables as major themes. CONCLUSIONS:This survey of CCM-trained anesthesiologists described a high rate of board certification, practice in academic settings, and participation in resident education. Areas of dissatisfaction with an anesthesia/critical care practice included burnout, work/life balance, and lack of respect. These results may increase recruitment of anesthesiologists into critical care and inform strategies to improve satisfaction with anesthesia critical care practice, fellowship training.
PMID: 32665465
ISSN: 1526-7598
CID: 4528192