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Breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infections, morbidity, and seroreactivity following initial COVID-19 vaccination series and additional dose in patients with SLE in New York City

Saxena, Amit; Engel, Alexis J; Banbury, Brittany; Hasan, Ghadeer; Fraser, Nicola; Zaminski, Devyn; Masson, Mala; Haberman, Rebecca H; Scher, Jose U; Ho, Gary; Law, Jammie; Rackoff, Paula; Tseng, Chung-E; Belmont, H Michael; Clancy, Robert M; Buyon, Jill P; Izmirly, Peter M
PMCID:9275793
PMID: 35856060
ISSN: 2665-9913
CID: 5279052

Methotrexate and TNF inhibitors affect long-term immunogenicity to COVID-19 vaccination in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disease

Haberman, Rebecca H; Um, Seungha; Axelrad, Jordan E; Blank, Rebecca B; Uddin, Zakwan; Catron, Sydney; Neimann, Andrea L; Mulligan, Mark J; Herat, Ramin Sedaghat; Hong, Simon J; Chang, Shannon; Myrtaj, Arnold; Ghiasian, Ghoncheh; Izmirly, Peter M; Saxena, Amit; Solomon, Gary; Azar, Natalie; Samuels, Jonathan; Golden, Brian D; Rackoff, Paula; Adhikari, Samrachana; Hudesman, David P; Scher, Jose U
PMCID:8975261
PMID: 35403000
ISSN: 2665-9913
CID: 5218902

Minor Salivary Gland Biopsy in Diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome

Gordon, Alex J; Patel, Aneek; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Cheng; Saxena, Amit; Rackoff, Paula; Givi, Babak
Objective/UNASSIGNED:Previous studies have questioned the safety and efficacy of minor salivary gland biopsy in the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome, citing complications and difficulty of pathologic evaluation. This study aims to determine the rate of biopsy specimen adequacy and the risk of complications after minor salivary gland biopsy. Study Design/UNASSIGNED:Case series. Setting/UNASSIGNED:Single tertiary care center. Methods/UNASSIGNED:sample were considered positive. Results/UNASSIGNED:We identified 110 patients who underwent minor salivary gland biopsy. Ninety-three (85%) were female, and the median age was 49.1 years (range, 18.7-80.5). Seventy-seven procedures (70%) were performed in the office setting, and 33 (30%) were performed in the operating room. Nearly all biopsy samples (n = 108, 98%) were adequate, and 33 (31%) were interpreted as positive. Four patients (4%) experienced temporary lip numbness, which resolved with conservative management. No permanent complications were reported after lip biopsy. Nineteen (58%) patients with positive biopsy results had no Sjögren's-specific antibodies. Most patients with positive biopsy results (n = 20, 61%) subsequently started immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusion/UNASSIGNED:Minor salivary gland biopsy can be performed safely and effectively in both the office and the operating room. This procedure provides clinically meaningful information and can be reasonably recommended in patients suspected to have Sjögren's syndrome.
PMCID:9326841
PMID: 35909442
ISSN: 2473-974x
CID: 5287772

Low incidence and transient elevation of autoantibodies post mRNA COVID-19 vaccination in inflammatory arthritis

Blank, Rebecca B; Haberman, Rebecca H; Qian, Kun; Samanovic, Marie; Castillo, Rochelle; Jimenez Hernandez, Anthony; Vasudevapillai Girija, Parvathy; Catron, Sydney; Uddin, Zakwan; Rackoff, Paula; Solomon, Gary; Azar, Natalie; Rosenthal, Pamela; Izmirly, Peter; Samuels, Jonathan; Golden, Brian; Reddy, Soumya; Mulligan, Mark J; Hu, Jiyuan; Scher, Jose U
OBJECTIVES/OBJECTIVE:Autoantibody seroconversion has been extensively studied in the context of COVID-19 infection but data regarding post-vaccination autoantibody production is lacking. Here we aimed to determine the incidence of common autoantibody formation following mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) and in healthy controls. METHODS:Autoantibody seroconversion was measured by serum ELISA in a longitudinal cohort of IA participants and healthy controls before and after COVID-19 mRNA-based immunization. RESULTS:Overall, there was a significantly lower incidence of ANA seroconversion in participants who did not contract COVID-19 prior to vaccination compared with those who been previously infected (7.4% vs 24.1%, p= 0.014). Incidence of de novo anti-cyclic citrullinated protein (CCP) seroconversion in all participants was low at 4.9%. Autoantibody levels were typically of low titer, transient, and not associated with increase in IA flares. CONCLUSIONS:In both health and inflammatory arthritis, the risk of autoantibody seroconversion is lower following mRNA-based immunization than following natural SARS-CoV-2 infection. Importantly, seroconversion does not correlate with self-reported IA disease flare risk, further supporting the encouragement of mRNA-based COVID-19 immunization in the IA population.
PMID: 35640110
ISSN: 1462-0332
CID: 5235902

Evaluation of Immune Response and Disease Status in SLE Patients Following SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination

Izmirly, Peter M; Kim, Mimi Y; Samanovic, Marie; Fernandez-Ruiz, Ruth; Ohana, Sharon; Deonaraine, Kristina K; Engel, Alexis J; Masson, Mala; Xie, Xianhong; Cornelius, Amber R; Herati, Ramin S; Haberman, Rebecca H; Scher, Jose U; Guttmann, Allison; Blank, Rebecca B; Plotz, Benjamin; Haj-Ali, Mayce; Banbury, Brittany; Stream, Sara; Hasan, Ghadeer; Ho, Gary; Rackoff, Paula; Blazer, Ashira D; Tseng, Chung-E; Belmont, H Michael; Saxena, Amit; Mulligan, Mark J; Clancy, Robert M; Buyon, Jill P
OBJECTIVE:To evaluate seroreactivity and disease flares after COVID-19 vaccination in a multi-ethnic/racial cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS:90 SLE patients and 20 healthy controls receiving a complete COVID-19 vaccine regimen were included. IgG seroreactivity to the SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) and SARS-CoV-2 microneutralization were used to evaluate B cell responses; IFN-γ production to assess T cell responses was measured by ELISpot. Disease activity was measured by the hybrid SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and flares were assigned by the SELENA/SLEDAI flare index. RESULTS:Overall, fully vaccinated SLE patients produced significantly lower IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD than controls. Twenty-six SLE patients (28.8%) generated an IgG response below that of the lowest control (<100 units/ml). In logistic regression analyses, the use of any immunosuppressant or prednisone and a normal anti-dsDNA level prior to vaccination associated with decreased vaccine responses. IgG seroreactivity to the SARS-CoV-2 Spike RBD strongly correlated with the SARS-CoV-2 microneutralization titers and antigen-specific IFN-γ production determined by ELISpot. In a subset of patients with poor antibody responses, IFN-γ production was likewise diminished. Pre-/post-vaccination SLEDAI scores were similar. Only 11.4% of patients had a post-vaccination flare; 1.3% were severe. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:In a multi-ethnic/racial study of SLE patients 29% had a low response to the COVID-19 vaccine which was associated with being on immunosuppression. Reassuringly, disease flares were rare. While minimal protective levels remain unknown, these data suggest protocol development is needed to assess efficacy of booster vaccination.
PMCID:8426963
PMID: 34347939
ISSN: 2326-5205
CID: 5046532

Methotrexate hampers immunogenicity to BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine in immune-mediated inflammatory disease

Haberman, Rebecca H; Herati, Ramin; Simon, David; Samanovic, Marie; Blank, Rebecca B; Tuen, Michael; Koralov, Sergei; Atreya, Raja; Tascilar, Koray; Allen, Joseph; Castillo, Rochelle; Cornelius, Amber; Rackoff, Paula; Solomon, Gary; Adhikari, Samrachana; Azar, Natalie; Rosenthal, Pamela; Izmirly, Peter; Samuels, Jonathan; Golden, Brian; Reddy, Soumya M; Neurath, Markus; Abramson, Steven B; Schett, Georg; Mulligan, Mark; Scher, Jose U
PMID: 34035003
ISSN: 1468-2060
CID: 4888812

Methotrexate hampers immunogenicity to BNT162B2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine in immune-mediated inflammatory disease [Meeting Abstract]

Haberman, R; Herati, R; Simon, D; Samanovic, M; Tuen, M; Blank, R; Koralov, S; Atreya, R; Tascilar, K; Allen, J; Castillo, R; Cornelius, A; Rackoff, P; Solomon, G; Adhikari, S; Azar, N; Rosenthal, P; Izmirly, P; Samuels, J; Golden, B; Reddy, S; Neurath, M; Abramson, S B; Schett, G; Mulligan, M; Scher, J
Background/Purpose: Patients with immune mediated inflammatory disorders (IMIDs) have an inherently heightened susceptibility to infection and may be considered high risk for developing COVID-19. While data regarding the COVID-19 vaccine's immunogenicity in an immunocompetent adult population is rapidly emerging, the ability of IMID patients to adequately respond to these vaccines is not known. Here, we investigate the humoral and cellular immune response to mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in patients with IMIDs on immunomodulatory treatment Methods: Patients with immune mediated inflammatory disorders (IMIDs) have an inherently heightened susceptibility to infection and may be considered high risk for developing COVID-19. While data regarding the COVID-19 vaccine's immunogenicity in an immunocompetent adult population is rapidly emerging, the ability of IMID patients to adequately respond to these vaccines is not known. Here, we investigate the humoral and cellular immune response to mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in patients with IMIDs on immunomodulatory treatment.
Result(s): The NY cohort baseline characteristics are found in Table 1. The Erlangen cohort consisted of 182 healthy subjects, 11 subjects with IMID receiving TNFi monotherapy, and 20 subjects with IMID on MTX monotherapy. In both cohorts, healthy individuals and those with IMID not on MTX were similar in age, while those IMID patients receiving MTX were generally older. In the NY cohort, of the healthy participants, 96.3% demonstrated adequate humoral immune response. Patients with IMID not on MTX achieved a similar rate of high antibody response rate (91.8%), while those on MTX had a lower rate of adequate humoral response (75.0%) (Figure 1A). This remains true even after the exclusion of patients who had evidence of prior COVID-19 infection (P= 0.014). Of note, 3 out of the 4 IMID patients receiving rituximab did not produce an adequate response. Similarly, in the Erlangen validation cohort, 98.3% of healthy controls, 90.9% of patients with IMID receiving TNFi monotherapy, and 50.0% receiving MTX monotherapy achieved adequate immunogenicity (Figure 1B). These differences remain significant when combining the cohorts, using a stricter definition of adequate response, and in a subgroup analysis by age. Cellular response was also analyzed in a subgroup of the NY cohort before and after second vaccination. Activated CD8+ T cells (CD8+ T cells expressing Ki67 and CD38) and the granzyme B-producing subset of these activated CD8+ T cells, were induced in immunocompetent adults and those with IMID not on MTX, but not induced in patients receiving MTX (Figure 2).
Conclusion(s): In two independent cohorts of IMID patients, MTX, a widely used immunomodulator for the treatment of several IMIDs, adversely affected humoral and cellular immune response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Although precise cut offs for immunogenicity that correlate with vaccine efficacy are yet to be established, our findings suggest that different strategies may need to be explored in patients with IMID taking MTX to increase the chances of immunization efficacy against SARS-CoV-2, as has been demonstrated for other viral vaccines
PMCID:
EMBASE:637275567
ISSN: 2326-5205
CID: 5164692

Methotrexate Hampers Immunogenicity to BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 Vaccine in Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Disease

Haberman, Rebecca H; Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Simon, David; Samanovic, Marie; Blank, Rebecca B; Tuen, Michael; Koralov, Sergei B; Atreya, Raja; Tascilar, Koray; Allen, Joseph R; Castillo, Rochelle; Cornelius, Amber R; Rackoff, Paula; Solomon, Gary; Adhikari, Samrachana; Azar, Natalie; Rosenthal, Pamela; Izmirly, Peter; Samuels, Jonathan; Golden, Brian; Reddy, Soumya; Neurath, Markus; Abramson, Steven B; Schett, Georg; Mulligan, Mark J; Scher, Jose U
Objective/UNASSIGNED:To investigate the humoral and cellular immune response to mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) on immunomodulatory treatment. Methods/UNASSIGNED:Established patients at NYU Langone Health with IMID (n=51) receiving the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination were assessed at baseline and after second immunization. Healthy subjects served as controls (n=26). IgG antibody responses to the spike protein were analyzed for humoral response. Cellular immune response to SARS-CoV-2 was further analyzed using high-parameter spectral flow cytometry. A second independent, validation cohort of controls (n=182) and patients with IMID (n=31) from Erlangen, Germany were also analyzed for humoral immune response. Results/UNASSIGNED:Although healthy subjects (n=208) and IMID patients on biologic treatments (mostly on TNF blockers, n=37) demonstrate robust antibody responses (over 90%), those patients with IMID on background methotrexate (n=45) achieve an adequate response in only 62.2% of cases. Similarly, IMID patients do not demonstrate an increase in CD8+ T cell activation after vaccination. Conclusions/UNASSIGNED:In two independent cohorts of IMID patients, methotrexate, a widely used immunomodulator for the treatment of several IMIDs, adversely affected humoral and cellular immune response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Although precise cut offs for immunogenicity that correlate with vaccine efficacy are yet to be established, our findings suggest that different strategies may need to be explored in patients with IMID taking methotrexate to increase the chances of immunization efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 as has been demonstrated for augmenting immunogenicity to other viral vaccines. KEY MESSAGES/UNASSIGNED:These results suggest that patients on methotrexate may need alternate vaccination strategies such as additional doses of vaccine, dose modification of methotrexate, or even a temporary discontinuation of this drug. Further studies will be required to explore the effect of these approaches on mRNA vaccine immunogenicity.
PMCID:8132259
PMID: 34013285
ISSN: n/a
CID: 4877422

Skeletal Fluorosis: A Tricky Diagnosis

Rackoff, Paula
PMID: 26097233
ISSN: 2326-5205
CID: 1640802

Multiple painless masses

Chitkara, Munish; Rackoff, Paula J; Beltran, Luis S
PMID: 24318072
ISSN: 0364-2348
CID: 810972