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IL1RN Polymorphism Predicts Weight Loss, Inflammatory Biomarker Changes and Knee Osteoarthritis Pain Relief after Bariatric Surgery [Meeting Abstract]

Samuels, J; Bomfim, F; Attur, M; Ren-Fielding, C; Parikh, M; La, Rocca-Vieira R; Abramson, S B
Background/Purpose: Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (SKOA) patients with obesity who undergo bariatric surgery experience knee pain relief, though the reduced mechanical load explains only part of the improvement. A reduction in inflammatory biomarkers from adipose tissue may also impact pain. We previously identified an IL1RN haplotype (TTG; rs419598, rs315952, and rs9005) that associates with OA severity and inflammatory markers. We aimed to determine whether TTG distinguishes patients who lose more weight and have more significant decreases in inflammation with greater knee OA pain relief.
Method(s): From 2013-2019 we enrolled patients >=30 years old with BMI >=30 kg/m 2 and painful knee OA who planned surgical (sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, or laparoscopic band) or medical weight loss (MWL) at Bellevue Hospital or NYU Langone Health. Patients with lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriatic arthritis were excluded. Weight-bearing knee x-rays assessed OA severity to confirm a Kellgren-Lawrence grade of at least 1 (scale 0-4). Participants completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes (KOOS) questionnaire and provided blood at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Patients were genotyped to determine whether they carried 1 or 2 copies of the TTG haplotype (TTG-1/2) or none (TTG-0). Sleeve was the most common weight loss intervention, therefore our analysis is focused on this surgical subset to minimize variable effects on weight and biomarkers.
Result(s): We enrolled 113 patients (95 F, 18 M) with painful knee OA prior to their weight loss intervention. The mean age, BMI, and KOOS pain at baseline were 50.3 +/- 12.0 years, 44.8 +/- 8.9 kg/m 2, and 48.4 +/- 18.2 (0-100, with 100 = no pain). Of 113 patients, 48 underwent sleeve, 20 bypass, 9 laparoscopic banding, 12 did not have the surgery, and 24 pursued medical weight loss. The 77 who completed surgery had a mean % excess weight loss (%EWL) of 51.7 after 6 months, with significant decreases in hsCRP (4.4 mg/L) and leptin (32.8 ng/dL), and mean KOOS pain improvement of 22.4 (MCID= 16.7). The corresponding changes for patients who tried various MWL regimens were modest at best. We obtained the IL1RN haplotype for 45 of the 48 sleeve patients, and found 34 (70.8%) carried the TTG-1 or TTG 2 haplotype while 11 were TTG-0 (with similar baseline age, BMI, and KOOS for the two groups). At each follow-up time point through 6 months (Figure 1), TTG-1/2 patients had more difficulty losing weight than the TTG-0 group (p< 0.005 by ANOVA), with corresponding smaller reductions in hs CRP (p=0.36) and leptin (p=0.006). TTG-1/2 carriers also reported less KOOS pain relief relative to the TTG-0 group (p=0.021), markedly at 1 and 3 months with some improvement later (Table 1). All of these findings held true when only plotting data only from the 23 patients (18 TTG-1/2, 5 TTG-0) who completed each of the followup visits.
Conclusion(s): SKOA patients with obesity achieve marked excess weight loss, reductions in inflammatory mediators, and knee pain relief with bariatric surgery. The subset of patients with the TTG-0 IL1RN haplotype demonstrated more significant and/or rapid improvement in each of these outcomes, suggesting a potential predictor of which OA patients will have a more successful response to bariatric surgery
EMBASE:634232550
ISSN: 2326-5205
CID: 4810322

Knee OA Outcomes in Patients with Severe Obesity Following Bariatric Surgery or Total Knee Arthroplasty [Meeting Abstract]

Samuels, J; Zak, S; Schwarzkopf, R; Ren-Fielding, C; Parikh, M; McLawhorn, A; Browne, J; Hallowell, P; Irving, B; Wood, C; Still, C; Benotti, P
Background/Purpose: High body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) is a modifiable risk factor that has been associated with the development and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) and knee pain. While total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the gold standard for the treatment of end stage OA, morbidly obese patients (BMI>=40kg/m2) are often required to lose weight prior to TKA due to increased surgical risk and a higher rate of complications. While conservative weight-loss often fails to help these patients, bariatric surgery can be an alternative option. Here we present interim data from the trial entitled "Surgical Weight-loss to Improve Functional Status Trajectories following arthroplasty for painful knee osteoarthritis". This current multi-center, prospective study compares pain and functional outcomes in patients receiving bariatric surgery prior to TKA versus obese patients who go straight to TKA.
Method(s): Patients with BMI >=40 kg/m2 and painful knee osteoarthritis who met the indications for TKA were recruited at four hospital centers. Patients with a BMI >35 kg/m2 were also recruited if they had a qualifying comorbid condition including obstructive sleep apnea, diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia. Patients were assigned to either the bariatric (BAR) or TKA arm based on surgical choice (goal n=150 for each arm), with all bariatric patients having anatomy-altering sleeve gastrectomy or gastric bypass. At baseline and several time points after surgery (Figure 1), we documented height, weight, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), visual analog pain (VAS) scales, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and had patients perform functional assessments (Timed-Up and Go, 30-second Chair Stand and 40-meter fast paced walk test). We targeted minimum detectable change (MDC) in outcomes for the VAS for knee pain (33% reduction), Timed Up and Go (decrease by 2 seconds), 30-second Chair Stand (increase by 2 reps), 40-meter fast paced walk (increase by 0.16 m/s), WOMAC score (16% reduction), and the KOOS pain score (10-point improvement). Using a logistic regression to adjust for age and baseline BMI, we compared the percentage of patients in the two arms who achieved an MDC for the various outcomes.
Result(s): To date, 25 BAR and 28 TKA patients have completed their follow-up visits through at least 6 months. Although there was a similar sex distribution, the bariatric group was younger (52 vs 60 years old, p=0.0023) with a higher baseline BMI (47.0 vs 41.6 p=0.0006). Most bariatric patients achieved comparable improvement to the TKA cohort with regards to the benchmarks of the 30-second Chair Stand (TKA 54% vs BAR 33%, p=0.156), KOOS pain score (TKA 91% vs BAR 67%, p=0.130), the Visual Analog Pain Scale (TKA 50% vs BAR 39%, p=0.466), Timed Up and Go test (TKA 43% vs BAR 22%, p=0.141) and the 40-meter fast paced walk (TKA 61% vs BAR 35%, p=0.073). The TKA cohort had a greater percent with a MDC for the WOMAC (TKA 88% vs BAR 54%, p=0.030).
Conclusion(s): In morbidly obese patients who are eligible for TKA, bariatric surgery may result in modest improvements in knee outcomes and may eventually delay the need for a TKA
EMBASE:634232840
ISSN: 2326-5205
CID: 4810642

Imaging of OA - From disease modification to clinical utility

Hayashi, Daichi; Roemer, Frank W; Eckstein, Felix; Samuels, Jonathan; Guermazi, Ali
Multiple disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) trials were done in the last two decades, but no pharmacological agent has yet been approved by regulatory agencies as an effective therapy to date. Given the fact that we have seen the recent discontinuation of several late-stage drug development trials, a careful strategy is needed in formulating a plan for a successful DMOAD trial - including the various roles of imaging. This narrative review article will summarize how imaging is utilized in osteoarthritis from the perspective of disease modification to clinical utility. We will describe how semi-quantitative and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging approaches have been deployed in DMOAD trials. We will then review the utility of musculoskeletal ultrasound in research and clinical settings. Finally, novel hybrid positron emission tomography/MRI techniques and current research using artificial intelligence will be discussed, focusing on original research. Older publications are included for the discussion of the previous DMOAD trials and other relevant topics where deemed appropriate.
PMID: 32943330
ISSN: 1532-1770
CID: 4629862

The combination of an inflammatory peripheral blood gene expression and imaging biomarkers enhance prediction of radiographic progression in knee osteoarthritis

Attur, Mukundan; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Zhou, Hua; Samuels, Jonathan; Chang, Gregory; Bencardino, Jenny; Rosenthal, Pamela; Rybak, Leon; Huebner, Janet L; Kraus, Virginia B; Abramson, Steven B
OBJECTIVE:Predictive biomarkers of progression in knee osteoarthritis are sought to enable clinical trials of structure-modifying drugs. A peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) inflammatory gene signature, MRI-based bone marrow lesions (BML) and meniscus extrusion scores, meniscal lesions, and osteophytes on X-ray each have been shown separately to predict radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) in subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (SKOA). In these studies, we determined whether the combination of the PBL inflammatory gene expression and these imaging findings at baseline enhanced the prognostic value of either alone. METHODS:PBL inflammatory gene expression (increased mRNA for IL-1β, TNFα, and COX-2), routine radiographs, and 3T knee MRI were assessed in two independent populations with SKOA: an NYU cohort and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). At baseline and 24 months, subjects underwent standardized fixed-flexion knee radiographs and knee MRI. Medial JSN (mJSN) was determined as the change in medial JSW. Progressors were defined by an mJSN cut-point (≥ 0.5 mm/24 months). Models were evaluated by odds ratios (OR) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). RESULTS:We validated our prior finding in these two independent (NYU and OAI) cohorts, individually and combined, that an inflammatory PBL inflammatory gene expression predicted radiographic progression of SKOA after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI. Similarly, the presence of baseline BML and meniscal lesions by MRI or semiquantitative osteophyte score on X-ray each predicted radiographic medial JSN at 24 months. The combination of the PBL inflammatory gene expression and medial BML increased the AUC from 0.66 (p = 0.004) to 0.75 (p < 0.0001) and the odds ratio from 6.31 to 19.10 (p < 0.0001) in the combined cohort of 473 subjects. The addition of osteophyte score to BML and PBL inflammatory gene expression further increased the predictive value of any single biomarker. A causal analysis demonstrated that the PBL inflammatory gene expression and BML independently influenced mJSN. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:The use of the PBL inflammatory gene expression together with imaging biomarkers as combinatorial predictive biomarkers, markedly enhances the identification of radiographic progressors. The identification of the SKOA population at risk for progression will help in the future design of disease-modifying OA drug trials and personalized medicine strategies.
PMID: 32912331
ISSN: 1478-6362
CID: 4589512

A Standardized, Pragmatic Approach to Knee Ultrasound for Clinical Research in Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

Yerich, Nadiya V; Alvarez, Carolina; Schwartz, Todd A; Savage-Guin, Serena; Renner, Jordan B; Bakewell, Catherine J; Kohler, Minna J; Lin, Janice; Samuels, Jonathan; Nelson, Amanda E
OBJECTIVE:This study sought to develop and employ a comprehensive and standardized ultrasound (US) protocol and scoring atlas for the evaluation of features relevant to knee osteoarthritis (KOA) in a community-based cohort in the United States, with the goals of demonstrating feasibility, reliability, and validity. METHODS:We utilized data from the fourth follow-up (2016-2018) of the Johnston County OA Project, which includes individuals with (~50%) and without radiographic KOA. All participants underwent standardized knee radiography and completed standard questionnaires including the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Bilateral knee US images were obtained by a trained sonographer using a standardized protocol and scored by trained rheumatologists using an atlas developed for this study. A total of 396 knees were each scored by two readers according to the atlas. Associations between US features, radiographic findings (graded by an expert radiologist), and KOOS scores were assessed. RESULTS:Overall interreader reliability for US scoring was fair to moderate. The strongest correlations between US and radiographic features were seen for osteophytes, and similarly strong correlations were seen between US osteophytes and overall radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence Grade, demonstrating criterion validity. Features of effusion/synovitis and osteophytes were most associated with KOOS pain and impaired function. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:US is a feasible, reliable, and valid method to assess features relevant to KOA in clinical and research settings. The protocol and atlas developed in this study can be utilized to evaluate KOA in a standardized fashion in future clinical studies, enabling greater utilization of this valuable modality in osteoarthritis.
PMID: 32597564
ISSN: 2578-5745
CID: 4524992

Association of body mass index and osteoarthritis with healthcare expenditures and utilization

Johnston, Stephen S; Ammann, Eric; Scamuffa, Robin; Samuels, Jonathan; Stokes, Andrew; Fegelman, Elliott; Hsiao, Chia-Wen
Objective/UNASSIGNED:Osteoarthritis is highly prevalent and, on aggregate, is one of the largest contributors to US spending on hospital-based health care. This study sought to examine body mass index (BMI)-related variation in the association of osteoarthritis with healthcare utilization and expenditures. Methods/UNASSIGNED:. Study outcomes and covariates were measured during a 1-year evaluation period spanning 6 months before and after index. Multivariable regression analyses examined the association of BMI with osteoarthritis prevalence, and the combined associations of osteoarthritis and BMI with osteoarthritis-related medication utilization, all-cause hospitalization, and healthcare expenditures. Results/UNASSIGNED:< .01): utilization rates for analgesic medications (41.5-53.5%); rates of all-cause hospitalization (26.3%-32.0%); and total healthcare expenditures ($18 204-$23 372). Conclusion/UNASSIGNED:The prevalence and economic burden of osteoarthritis grow with increasing BMI; primary prevention of weight-related osteoarthritis and secondary weight management may help to alleviate this burden.
PMCID:7156818
PMID: 32313672
ISSN: 2055-2238
CID: 4392082

Associations between knee symptoms and ultrasound features in knee osteoarthritis [Meeting Abstract]

Yerich, N; Alvarez, C; Schwartz, T; Savage-Guin, S; Bakewell, C; Kohler, M; Lin, J; Samuels, J; Nelson, A
Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, and knee OA is highly prevalent among older adults. Our objective was to evaluate the relationships between ultrasound (US) features and knee symptoms.
Method(s): Our sample (n=203) consisted of cross-sectional data from participants attending the fourth follow-up (2016-2018) of the Johnston County OA Project-a longitudinal population-based prospective cohort study in North Carolina. An US-trained radiology technologist scanned all participants' bilateral knees using a written protocol; the images were scored using a standardized atlas. Logistic regression modeling, using generalized estimating equations to account for correlation between knees, was used to evaluate the associations between the presence of various US features and self-reported knee symptoms and produce adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Each model was adjusted for sex, race, BMI, education, comorbidities, other symptomatic joints, and increasing age.
Result(s): The strongest association between knee symptoms and US features was seen for severe medial osteophytes which increased the odds of reporting knee symptoms by 11 times. Severe lateral osteophytes increased the odds of knee symptoms by over 6 times. Both medial and lateral cartilage damage more than doubled the odds of knee symptoms. Both popliteal cysts and severe effusion/synovitis tripled the odds of reporting at least mild knee symptoms; synovitis was more strongly associated with knee symptoms than effusion. The association between osteophytes and symptoms varied by age, such that participants at age 65 had four times the odds of symptoms in the presence of severe medial osteophytes, increasing to 10 times at age 75.
Conclusion(s): Older participants had significantly higher odds of knee symptoms in the presence of medial osteophytes-a key feature of OA-which clinicians may use to initiate early symptom management. Further studies are needed to evaluate the temporal relationships between US features and knee symptoms throughout the aging process
EMBASE:633776148
ISSN: 1532-5415
CID: 4757592

2019 American College of Rheumatology/Arthritis Foundation Guideline for the Management of Osteoarthritis of the Hand, Hip, and Knee

Kolasinski, Sharon L; Neogi, Tuhina; Hochberg, Marc C; Oatis, Carol; Guyatt, Gordon; Block, Joel; Callahan, Leigh; Copenhaver, Cindy; Dodge, Carole; Felson, David; Gellar, Kathleen; Harvey, William F; Hawker, Gillian; Herzig, Edward; Kwoh, C Kent; Nelson, Amanda E; Samuels, Jonathan; Scanzello, Carla; White, Daniel; Wise, Barton; Altman, Roy D; DiRenzo, Dana; Fontanarosa, Joann; Giradi, Gina; Ishimori, Mariko; Misra, Devyani; Shah, Amit Aakash; Shmagel, Anna K; Thoma, Louise M; Turgunbaev, Marat; Turner, Amy S; Reston, James
OBJECTIVE:To develop an evidence-based guideline for the comprehensive management of osteoarthritis (OA) as a collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the Arthritis Foundation, updating the 2012 ACR recommendations for the management of hand, hip, and knee OA. METHODS:We identified clinically relevant population, intervention, comparator, outcomes questions and critical outcomes in OA. A Literature Review Team performed a systematic literature review to summarize evidence supporting the benefits and harms of available educational, behavioral, psychosocial, physical, mind-body, and pharmacologic therapies for OA. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of the evidence. A Voting Panel, including rheumatologists, an internist, physical and occupational therapists, and patients, achieved consensus on the recommendations. RESULTS:Based on the available evidence, either strong or conditional recommendations were made for or against the approaches evaluated. Strong recommendations were made for exercise, weight loss in patients with knee and/or hip OA who are overweight or obese, self-efficacy and self-management programs, tai chi, cane use, hand orthoses for first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint OA, tibiofemoral bracing for tibiofemoral knee OA, topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for knee OA, oral NSAIDs, and intraarticular glucocorticoid injections for knee OA. Conditional recommendations were made for balance exercises, yoga, cognitive behavioral therapy, kinesiotaping for first CMC OA, orthoses for hand joints other than the first CMC joint, patellofemoral bracing for patellofemoral knee OA, acupuncture, thermal modalities, radiofrequency ablation for knee OA, topical NSAIDs, intraarticular steroid injections and chondroitin sulfate for hand OA, topical capsaicin for knee OA, acetaminophen, duloxetine, and tramadol. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:This guideline provides direction for clinicians and patients making treatment decisions for the management of OA. Clinicians and patients should engage in shared decision-making that accounts for patients' values, preferences, and comorbidities. These recommendations should not be used to limit or deny access to therapies.
PMID: 31908149
ISSN: 2151-4658
CID: 4257122

2019 American College of Rheumatology/Arthritis Foundation Guideline for the Management of Osteoarthritis of the Hand, Hip, and Knee

Kolasinski, Sharon L; Neogi, Tuhina; Hochberg, Marc C; Oatis, Carol; Guyatt, Gordon; Block, Joel; Callahan, Leigh; Copenhaver, Cindy; Dodge, Carole; Felson, David; Gellar, Kathleen; Harvey, William F; Hawker, Gillian; Herzig, Edward; Kwoh, C Kent; Nelson, Amanda E; Samuels, Jonathan; Scanzello, Carla; White, Daniel; Wise, Barton; Altman, Roy D; DiRenzo, Dana; Fontanarosa, Joann; Giradi, Gina; Ishimori, Mariko; Misra, Devyani; Shah, Amit Aakash; Shmagel, Anna K; Thoma, Louise M; Turgunbaev, Marat; Turner, Amy S; Reston, James
OBJECTIVE:To develop an evidence-based guideline for the comprehensive management of osteoarthritis (OA) as a collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the Arthritis Foundation, updating the 2012 ACR recommendations for the management of hand, hip, and knee OA. METHODS:We identified clinically relevant population, intervention, comparator, outcomes questions and critical outcomes in OA. A Literature Review Team performed a systematic literature review to summarize evidence supporting the benefits and harms of available educational, behavioral, psychosocial, physical, mind-body, and pharmacologic therapies for OA. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of the evidence. A Voting Panel, including rheumatologists, an internist, physical and occupational therapists, and patients, achieved consensus on the recommendations. RESULTS:Based on the available evidence, either strong or conditional recommendations were made for or against the approaches evaluated. Strong recommendations were made for exercise, weight loss in patients with knee and/or hip OA who are overweight or obese, self-efficacy and self-management programs, tai chi, cane use, hand orthoses for first carpometacarpal (CMC) joint OA, tibiofemoral bracing for tibiofemoral knee OA, topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for knee OA, oral NSAIDs, and intraarticular glucocorticoid injections for knee OA. Conditional recommendations were made for balance exercises, yoga, cognitive behavioral therapy, kinesiotaping for first CMC OA, orthoses for hand joints other than the first CMC joint, patellofemoral bracing for patellofemoral knee OA, acupuncture, thermal modalities, radiofrequency ablation for knee OA, topical NSAIDs, intraarticular steroid injections and chondroitin sulfate for hand OA, topical capsaicin for knee OA, acetaminophen, duloxetine, and tramadol. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:This guideline provides direction for clinicians and patients making treatment decisions for the management of OA. Clinicians and patients should engage in shared decision-making that accounts for patients' values, preferences, and comorbidities. These recommendations should not be used to limit or deny access to therapies.
PMID: 31908163
ISSN: 2326-5205
CID: 4268932

Surgical and medical weight loss threshold dictates decreases in knee osteoarthritis pain but not reductions in inflammatory biomarkers [Meeting Abstract]

Bomfim, F; Chen, S; Zak, S; Jazrawi, T; Kundler, M; Qie, V; Peralta, L; Aleman, J; Ren-Fielding, C; Lofton, H; Patel, J; Attur, M; Abramson, S B; Samuels, J
Background/Purpose : Weight loss in obese patients can reduce knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain, even when physical therapy and intra-articular injections have failed. The impacts of either non-surgical or surgical weight loss on knee OA pain have been reported separately, but few studies have assessed them conjointly. While the decrease in mechanical load helps, the contribution of metabolic changes is less clear. We aimed to compare biomarker changes with weight loss as predictors of knee pain improvement, and consider a threshold of total weight loss necessary for these changes. Methods : Patients from the NYU Langone Weight Management program were screened for knee pain prior to bariatric surgery or the start of a medical weight loss (MWL) regimen. We excluded patients with autoimmune disease, recent malignancy, recent intra-articular knee injections, and lack of OA by Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) x-ray grading. The BMI, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) for pain, and blood samples were obtained at baseline and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months for evaluation of pain and biomarker levels. Results : Of 140 patients screened, 81 were eligible and enrolled (82.7% female; BMI 45.2+/-9.6 kg/m2, 31-74; age 52+/-12 years, 30-80). A total of 49 patients had surgery (10 bypass, 30 sleeve, 9 LapBand) and 24 medical weight loss. 33 patients completed visits up to 6 months (2 bypass, 18 sleeve, 6 LapBand, 7 MWL). By 1 month, the surgical patients had lost much more total weight than the MWL group (9.8% vs 4.1 %, p=0.001), and realized marked pain relief (p< 0.001). By 6 months both groups had continued to lose weight, proportionately greater for surgical patients with further pain improvement. (Figure 1) Leptin levels dropped at 1 and then 6 months with both methods of weight loss. The pro-inflammatory protein IL-1Ra decreased significantly by 6 months in the bariatric patients, but increased with the medical regimen across both time points. Soluble vascular adhesion protein 1 (sVAP-1), another pro-inflammatory protein that facilitates leukocyte infiltration, decreased at both the 1 and 6 month intervals -but much more in MWL than in surgical patients. Consistent with the literature, the anti-inflammatory soluble receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGE) mirrored KOOS pain improvement only in surgical patients and stabilized after 1 month, but did not change in the MWL group. (Table 1) In a subgroup analysis, the 14 surgical patients who lost at least 10% of Figure 1. Surgical and medical outcomes for % total weight loss (TWL), knee pain and biomarkers Table 1. total weight by 1 month had significantly less pain at 6 months than the 12 who did not meet the threshold (DELTAKOOS 47.5 vs 29.9) but the biomarker levels were similar. (Figure 2) Conclusion : Surgical and medically supervised weight loss both lead to significant decreases in adiposity, but only those having bariatric surgery realize significant pain relief. The anatomical changes of surgical (vs. medical) weight loss result in different metabolic cascades given divergent biomarker trends. Bariatric patients who lose more than 10 percent of total body weight within the first month are more likely to have better pain relief by 6 months, but the biomarker changes reflect anatomic intervention -and are not dependent on the degree of surgical weight loss
EMBASE:633059646
ISSN: 2326-5205
CID: 4633472