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Hypertension, diabetes, and corresponding annual clinical testing utilization: Comparison between Asian Indians and other races/ethnicities

Visaria, A; Islam, S; Polamarasetti, P; James, J; Raju, P; Sharma, A; Khangura, K K; Thawani, R; Dodani, S
Asian Indians are at increased risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases. We sought to determine differences between Asian Indians and other races/ethnicities in hypertension and diabetes prevalence and associated annual blood pressure (BP) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) testing. A total of 257,652 adults >=18 years from the 2011-2018 U.S. National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS) were included. BP and FBG testing in the past 12 months was defined dichotomously (yes/not yes). Racial/ethnic groups included non-Hispanic White (NHW), non-Hispanic Black (NHB), Asian Indian, Other Asians, and Hispanic/Multiracial. We used logistic regression, adjusting for covariates and the survey design. Analyses were completed from 08/2020-06/2021. Asian Indians (N = 3049) had 21% and 99% higher odds of hypertension and diabetes, respectively, than NHWs (aOR [95% CI]; hypertension: 1.21[1.04,1.40], diabetes: 1.99[1.64,2.41]). Accordingly, Asian Indians without diabetes had significantly higher odds of FBG screening than NHWs (Asian Indian: 1.41[1.25,1.59], NHB: 0.99 [0.95,1.04], Other Asian: 1.07[0.98, 1.18], Hispanic: 1.13[1.07,1.20]). Asian Indians without hypertension had a 14% insignificant increase in BP testing compared to NHWs (1.14[0.97,1.33]). Predictors of testing in Asian Indians included older age, doctor's visit, graduate-level education, insurance coverage, and history of hypertension or diabetes. NHBs with diabetes and Hispanics with hypertension had lower odds of FBG testing (0.75[0.66,0.84]) and BP testing (0.85[0.79,0.92]), respectively, than NHWs. Asian Indians have higher odds of diabetes and hypertension than NHWs and higher, but relatively lower, odds of FBG and BP testing. Increasing routine BP and FBG testing in Asian Indians in younger adults may allow for earlier detection of high-risk individuals.
Copyright
EMBASE:2013931297
ISSN: 0091-7435
CID: 4977772

A Phase 1 First in Human (FIH) Study of AMG 701, an Anti-B-Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Half-Life Extended (HLE) BiTE (bispecific T-cell engager) Molecule, in Relapsed/Refractory (RR) Multiple Myeloma (MM) [Meeting Abstract]

Harrison, S J; Minnema, M C; Lee, H C; Spencer, A; Kapoor, P; Madduri, D; Larsen, J; Ailawadhi, S; Kaufman, J L; Raab, M S; Hari, P; Iida, S; Vij, R; Davies, F E; Lesley, R; Upreti, V V; Yang, Z; Sharma, A; Minella, A; Lentzsch, S
Aims: To evaluate AMG 701, a BiTE molecule binding BCMA on MM cells and CD3 on T cells, in RR MM (Amgen, NCT03287908); primary objective was to evaluate safety and tolerability and estimate a biologically active dose; secondary objectives were to characterize pharmacokinetics (PK), anti-myeloma activity per IMWG criteria, and response duration.
Method(s): Patients with MM RR or intolerant to >=3 lines [proteasome inhibitor (PI), IMiD, anti-CD38 Ab as available] received AMG 701 IV infusions weekly in 4-week cycles until disease progression (PD). A 0.8-mg step dose was added prior to target doses >=1.2 mg to prevent severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Target dose was achieved by day 8 or sooner with earlier escalation. Exclusion criteria included: solely extramedullary disease; prior allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) in the past 6 months; prior autologous SCT in the past 90 days; CNS involvement; prior anti-BCMA therapy. The first 3 cohorts (dose 5-45 mug) had 1 patient each, the next cohorts (0.14-1.2 mg) had 3-4 patients each, and subsequent cohorts (1.6-12 mg) were to have 3-10 patients each. Minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured by next-generation sequencing (NGS, <=10-5 per IMWG) or flow cytometry (<=3x10-5).
Result(s): As of July 2, 2020, 75 patients received AMG 701. Patients had a median age of 63 years, a median time since diagnosis of 5.9 years, and a median (range) of 6 (1-25) prior lines of therapy; 27% of patients had extramedullary disease, 83% prior SCT, and 93% prior anti-CD38 Ab; 68% were triple refractory to a PI, an IMiD, and an anti-CD38 Ab. Median (Q1, Q3) treatment duration was 6.1 (3.1, 15.3) weeks and median follow-up on treatment was 1.7 (1.0, 3.7) months. Patients discontinued drug for PD (n=47), AEs (adverse events, n=4, 3 CRS, 1 CMV / PCP pneumonia), withdrew consent (4), other therapy (1), investigator discretion (1), and CNS disease (1); 17 patients remain on AMG 701. The most common hematological AEs were anemia (43%), neutropenia (23%), and thrombocytopenia (20%). The most common non-hematological AEs were CRS (61%), diarrhea (31%), fatigue (25%), and fever (25%). CRS was mostly grade 1 (n=19) or 2 (n=21) per Lee Blood 2014 criteria. All grade 3 CRS (n=5, 7%) were assessed as dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs); all were reversible with corticosteroids and tocilizumab, with median duration of 2 days. CRS grade 3 drivers included transient LFT increases in 3 patients and hypoxia in 2 patients. Other DLTs were 1 case each of transient grade 3 atrial fibrillation, transient grade 3 acidosis, and grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Serious AEs (n=29, 39%) included infections (13), CRS (7), and asymptomatic pancreatic enzyme rise (2, no imaging changes, 1 treatment related). There were 4 deaths from AEs, none related to AMG 701 (2 cases of sepsis, 1 of retroperitoneal bleeding, and 1 of subdural hematoma). Reversible treatment-related neurotoxicity was seen in 6 patients, with median duration of 1 day, all grade 1-2, and associated with CRS in 4 patients. The response rate was 36% (16/45) at doses of 3-12 mg; at <=1.6 mg (n=27), there was 1 response at 0.8 mg in a patient with low baseline soluble BCMA (sBCMA). With earlier dose escalation with 9 mg, the response rate was 83% (5/6, 3 PRs, 2 VGPRs), with 4/5 responders being triple refractory and 1 DLT of grade 3 CRS in this group. Across the study, responses included 4 stringent CRs (3 MRD-negative, 1 not yet tested), 1 MRD-negative CR, 6 VGPRs, and 6 PRs (Table). Median (Q1, Q3) time to response was 1.0 (1.0, 1.9) month, time to best response was 2.8 (1.0, 3.7) months, and response duration was 3.8 (1.9, 7.4) months, with maximum duration of 23 months; responses were ongoing at last assessment in 14/17 patients (Figure). MRD was tested in 4 patients (3 sCR, 1 CR) and all were negative (3 by NGS, 1 by flow); MRD negativity was ongoing at last observations up to 20 months later. AMG 701 exhibited a favorable PK profile in its target patient population of RR MM, with AMG 701 exposures increasing in a dose-related manner. Patient baseline sBCMA levels were identified as a determinant of AMG 701 free drug exposures; at higher doses, encouraging preliminary responses were seen even at the higher end of baseline sBCMA values.
Summary: In this FIH study with ongoing dose escalation, AMG 701, an anti-BCMA BiTE molecule, demonstrated a manageable safety profile, encouraging activity, and a favorable PK profile in patients with heavily pre-treated RR MM, supporting further evaluation of AMG 701. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Harrison: Janssen: Honoraria; Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Patents & Royalties: wrt panobinostat; GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria; CRISPR Therapeutics: Consultancy, Honoraria; Haemalogix: Consultancy; Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Janssen-Cilag: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; F. Hoffmann-La Roche: Consultancy, Honoraria. Minnema: Amgen: Honoraria; Servier: Honoraria; Gilead: Honoraria; Celgene Corporation: Honoraria, Research Funding; Janssen Cilag: Honoraria. Lee: Celgene: Consultancy, Research Funding; Genentech: Consultancy; GlaxoSmithKline: Consultancy, Research Funding; Genentech: Consultancy; Regeneron: Research Funding; Takeda: Consultancy, Research Funding; Janssen: Consultancy, Research Funding; Sanofi: Consultancy; Daiichi Sankyo: Research Funding; Amgen: Consultancy, Research Funding. Spencer: AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; Roche: Honoraria; Takeda: Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Sanofi: Consultancy, Honoraria; Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Secura Bio: Consultancy, Honoraria; Servier: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; HaemaLogiX: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding; BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau; Pfizer: Consultancy, Honoraria; Pharmamar: Research Funding. Kapoor: Cellectar: Consultancy; Amgen: Research Funding; Janssen: Research Funding; Sanofi: Consultancy, Research Funding; Takeda: Honoraria, Research Funding; GlaxoSmithKline: Research Funding; Celgene: Honoraria. Madduri: Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria; AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria; Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria; Foundation Medicine: Consultancy, Honoraria; GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Speaking Engagement, Speakers Bureau; Kinevant: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Speaking Engagement, Speakers Bureau; Legend: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Other: Speaking Engagement, Speakers Bureau; Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria. Larsen: Janssen Oncology: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Ailawadhi: Cellectar: Research Funding; BMS: Research Funding; Medimmune: Research Funding; Amgen: Research Funding; Takeda: Honoraria; Janssen: Research Funding; Pharmacyclics: Research Funding; Celgene: Honoraria; Phosplatin: Research Funding. Kaufman: Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria; Incyte: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Honoraria; AbbVie: Consultancy; Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria; Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria; Tecnopharma: Consultancy, Honoraria; Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria; Karyopharm: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Pharmacyclics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; TG Therapeutics: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sanofi/Genyzme: Consultancy, Honoraria. Raab: Takeda: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Heidelberg Pharma: Research Funding; Amgen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Janssen: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Novartis: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Sanofi: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding. Hari: BMS: Consultancy; Amgen: Consultancy; GSK: Consultancy; Janssen: Consultancy; Incyte Corporation: Consultancy; Takeda: Consultancy. Iida: AbbVie: Research Funding; Merck Sharpe Dohme: Research Funding; Kyowa Kirin: Research Funding; Chugai: Research Funding; Sanofi: Honoraria, Research Funding; Bristol-Myers Squibb: Honoraria, Research Funding; Daiichi Sankyo: Honoraria, Research Funding; Takeda: Honoraria, Research Funding; Ono: Honoraria, Research Funding; Celgene: Honoraria, Research Funding; Janssen: Honoraria, Research Funding. Davies: Celgene/BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding; Oncopeptides: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Roche: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Takeda: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Adaptive Biotech: Honoraria; Sanofi: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Lesley: Amgen Inc.: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Upreti: Amgen Inc.: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Yang: Amgen Inc.: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Sharma: Amgen Inc.: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Minella: Amgen Inc.: Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Ended employment in the past 24 months; Beam Therapeutics Inc.: Current Employment, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company. Lentzsch: Mesoblast: Divested equity in a private or publicly-traded company in the past 24 months; Janssen: Consultancy; Caelum Biosciences: Current equity holder in private company, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees; Magenta: Current equity holder in private company; Sanofi: Research Funding; Karyopharm: Research Funding; Celularity: Consultancy; Sorrento: Consultancy. OffLabel Disclosure: AMG 701, a half-life extended BiTE (bispecific T-cell engager) molecule is an investigational agent for multiple myeloma.
Copyright
EMBASE:2013852435
ISSN: 1528-0020
CID: 5148732

Distal convoluted tubule Cl-concentration is modulated via K+ channels and transporters

Su, X -T; Klett, N J; Sharma, A; Allen, C N; Wang, W -H; Yang, C -L; Ellison, D H
Cl-sensitive with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) plays a key role in regulating the thiazide-sensitive Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). Cl- enters DCT cells through NCC and leaves the cell across the basolateral membrane via the Cl- channel ClC-K2 or K+-Cl- cotransporter (KCC). While KCC is electroneutral, Cl- exit via ClC-K2 is electrogenic. Therefore, an alteration in DCT basolateral K+ channel activity is expected to influence Cl- movement across the basolateral membrane. Although a role for intracellular Cl- in the regulation of WNK and NCC has been established, intracellular Cl- concentrations ([Cl-]i) have not been directly measured in the mammalian DCT. Therefore, to measure [Cl-]i in DCT cells, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing an optogenetic kidney-specific Cl-Sensor and measured Cl- fluorescent imaging in the isolated DCT. Basal measurements indicated that the mean [Cl-]i was ~7 mM. Stimulation of Cl- exit with low-Cl- hypotonic solutions decreased [Cl-]i, whereas inhibition of KCC by DIOA or inhibition of ClC-K2 by NPPB increased [Cl-]i, suggesting roles for both KCC and ClC-K2 in the modulation of [Cl-]i. Blockade of basolateral K+ channels (Kir4.1/5.1) with barium significantly increased [Cl-]i. Finally, a decrease in extracellular K+ concentration transiently decreased [Cl-]i, whereas raising extracellular K+ transiently increased [Cl-]i, further suggesting a role for Kir4.1/5.1 in the regulation of [Cl-]i. We conclude that the alteration in ClC-K2, KCC, and Kir4.1/5.1 activity influences [Cl-]i in the DCT.
Copyright
EMBASE:2010725483
ISSN: 0363-6127
CID: 4870222

ST-Segment Elevation in Patients with Covid-19 - A Case Series [Letter]

Bangalore, Sripal; Sharma, Atul; Slotwiner, Alexander; Yatskar, Leonid; Harari, Rafael; Shah, Binita; Ibrahim, Homam; Friedman, Gary H; Thompson, Craig; Alviar, Carlos L; Chadow, Hal L; Fishman, Glenn I; Reynolds, Harmony R; Keller, Norma; Hochman, Judith S
PMID: 32302081
ISSN: 1533-4406
CID: 4383882

Exploring and quantifying performance differences in real world ambulation parameters in people with multiple sclerosis: multi-dimensional objective gait parameters [Meeting Abstract]

Srinivasan, J.; Giannuzzi, A.; Cascone, A.; Sharma, A.; Skudin, C.; Bumstead, B.; Fafard, L.; Jaenicke, K.; Trebing, S.; Burke, C.; Buhse, M.; Zarif, M.; Gudesblatt, M.
ISI:000485303101358
ISSN: 1352-4585
CID: 5344172

Walking in people with multiple sclerosis: objective gait parameters during varied walking paradigms across the EDSS reflects real world disease impact [Meeting Abstract]

Srinivasan, J.; Giannuzzi, A.; Cascone, A.; Sharma, A.; Skudin, C.; Bumstead, B.; Fafard, L.; Jaenicke, K.; Trebing, S.; Burke, C.; Buhse, M.; Zarif, M.; Gudesblatt, M.
ISI:000485303101360
ISSN: 1352-4585
CID: 5344182

Multiple sclerosis and walking - Is patient perception alone sufficient to appreciate the varied impacts of disease on real world walking: the cognitive elephant walks in the room [Meeting Abstract]

Srinivasan, J.; Giannuzzi, A.; Cascone, A.; Sharma, A.; Skudin, C.; Bumstead, B.; Fafard, L.; Jaenicke, K.; Trebing, S.; Burke, C.; Buhse, M.; Zarif, M.; Wilken, J.; Sullivan, C.; Fratto, T.; Gudesblatt, M.
ISI:000485303102346
ISSN: 1352-4585
CID: 5344222

Decreased Sphingolipid Synthesis Enhances Rhinovirus-Triggered Airway Hyperreactivity [Meeting Abstract]

Sharma, A.; Sung, B.; Veerappan, A.; Silver, R. B.; Kim, B.; Worgall, T. S.; Worgall, S.
ISI:000400372500382
ISSN: 1073-449x
CID: 3242922

Prognostic epigenetics

Chapter by: Abdelfatah, Eihab; Sharma, A; El Eissa, M; Ahuja, N
in: Medical epigenetics by Tollefsbol, Trygve O [Ed]
Amsterdam : Elsevier/Academic Press, [2016]
pp. -
ISBN: 9780128032398
CID: 5328342

Long-term clinical benefit of sirolimus-eluting stents compared to bare metal stents in the treatment of saphenous vein graft disease

Minutello, Robert M; Bhagan, Sherrita; Sharma, Atul; Slotwiner, Alexander J; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Cuomo, Linda J; Wong, S Chiu
OBJECTIVE:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) in the treatment of saphenous vein graft (SVG) disease. BACKGROUND:Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of SVG lesions with bare metal stents (BMS) is associated with frequent in-stent restenosis, progression of disease in nonstented SVG segments, and suboptimal clinical outcomes. While SES have been shown to reduce restenosis rates in various native lesion subsets, the long-term clinical impact of SES use in SVG lesions is less clear. METHODS:We compared our first 59 patients who underwent SES implantation in SVGs with 50 consecutive patients who received BMS in an equivalent time period prior to SES availability. Clinical outcomes were compared in both groups. RESULTS:Baseline clinical variables between the two groups were similar. Mean graft age in the SES cohort was older than that in the BMS cohort (12.9 years vs. 9.4 years). At follow-up, the SES group had a 24.6% absolute lower incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (25.4% vs. 50.0%), driven by a 20.7% absolute lower incidence of target vessel revascularization (TVR) (15.3% vs. 36.0%). The SES treatment group had a 24.1% lower rate of clinical restenosis (11.9% vs. 36.0%). The use of a SES was an independent negative predictor of MACE at a mean follow-up of 20 months (odds ratio [OR]= 0.48,P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS:Despite the placement of longer stents in patients with older, smaller SVGs, the use of SES in the treatment of SVG lesions appears to be safe and is associated with less clinical restenosis and more favorable long-term clinical outcomes as compared with BMS.
PMID: 18042050
ISSN: 0896-4327
CID: 2982992