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SO YOU WANT TO MAKE AN APP? TAKING DIGITAL CHILD MENTAL HEALTH IDEAS FROM VISION TO EXECUTION [Meeting Abstract]

Egger, Helen L.; Verduin, Timothy L.; Driscoll, Katherine; Podbury, Rachel
ISI:000579844101555
ISSN: 0890-8567
CID: 4685582

13.5 THE WONDER OF IT ALL: EARLY CHILDHOOD DIGITAL HEALTH [Meeting Abstract]

Egger, H L; Verduin, T L; Robinson, S; Lebwohl, R; Stein, C R; McGregor, K A; Zhao, C; Driscoll, K; Mann, D; Black, J
Objectives: We will: 1) describe the WonderLab, a digital health initiative within the New York University Langone Health Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; 2) introduce When to Wonder: Picky Eating, which is the WonderLab's first early childhood mental health digital study; and 3) present preliminary data from this study. Our first objective is to demonstrate how smartphone-based tools developed to assess children in their homes and the use of advanced data analytics can transform how, when, and where we assess young children's development and mental health. Our second objective is to share how our multidisciplinary team and agile development methodology enable us to build and launch a consumer-facing pediatric health app within an academic medical center.
Method(s): The WonderLab creates scalable mobile digital health tools to collect multimodal data in children's homes at the individual, family, and population levels. In December 2018, we released When to Wonder: Picky Eating, a national study with consent, enrollment, study activities, and feedback fully integrated in iOS and Android apps that parents download from the app stores. When to Wonder: Picky Eating focuses on the emotions and behaviors related to picky eating in children under the age of 7 years. Data sources include parent-report, video, audio, and an active task that children and parents play independently to quantify children's food preferences.
Result(s): We will present preliminary data from When to Wonder: Picky Eating to characterize normative and clinically significant emotions and behaviors related to picky eating. We will also share data on recruitment and engagement using social media, app performance, and "lessons learned" about digital pediatric health.
Conclusion(s): We create clinically and scientifically valid digital tools that parents and children want to use. We integrate clinical, scientific, engineering, design, data science, and bioethics expertise with collaborative user engagement and a "build, measure, learn" agile development culture. Our app-based study demonstrates how to build digital health tools that collect and analyze population-level and individual-level, multimodal data about children and families in the home. These new tools and approaches have the potential to transform our engagement with families and our delivery of care. EA, EC, MED
Copyright
EMBASE:2003280420
ISSN: 1527-5418
CID: 4131222

5.6 CHILDREN'S DIGITAL MENTAL HEALTH: A DESIGN AND ETHICAL FRAMEWORK [Meeting Abstract]

Egger, H L; Verduin, T L; Robinson, S; Lebwohl, R; Stein, C R; McGregor, K A; Zhao, C; Driscoll, K; Black, J
Objectives: Digital innovation has the potential to transform both the science and practice of child mental health. Creation of pediatric digital health tools requires that bioethics, human-centered design, and clinical and scientific expertise are integrated with digital tool development, digital data collection, and data analytics. In this talk, we will describe the opportunities for innovations in pediatric digital mental health and the concurrent ethical and security risks. We will then present a framework and design methodology for creating ethical, human-centered, clinically informed, and evidence-based digital tools for children's mental health.
Method(s): The data presented will come from our experience founding and leading the New York University Langone Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's WonderLab, which creates pediatric digital mental health tools that are evidence based, scalable, and ethical, as well as beautiful and fun so that parents and children would want to use them. The WonderLab brings clinical, scientific, digital engineering, digital design, data science, and bioethics expertise together with user engagement and a "build, measure, learn" agile development culture and methodology. We will use the WonderLab team's development and launch of our first app-based study, "When to Wonder: Picky Eating," to illustrate our framework and methodology.
Result(s): We will describe the innovation opportunities in pediatric digital mental health, including innovation in measurement, engagement, access, and collaborative methodologies. We will then present the ethical, privacy, security, and safety risks related to digital health applications and app-based data collection with children and their families. Finally, we will describe how the WonderLab team, methodology, and products innovate across multiple domains within an explicit ethical and clinically informed framework.
Conclusion(s): Digital innovation and data science have great potential to address the challenges facing our patients and our field. To build ethical and useful digital health tools for children's mental health requires multidisciplinary teams, user engagement, collaborative agile methodology, and a framework that ensures that innovations are integrated with and reflect our ethics and commitment to children. R, COMP, DAM
Copyright
EMBASE:2003280285
ISSN: 1527-5418
CID: 4131232

Peer perceptions and liking of children with anxiety disorders

Verduin, Timothy L; Kendall, Philip C
Examined three aspects of childhood anxiety and peer liking: (1) whether or not children can detect anxiety in age-mates, (2) the degree to which peer-reported anxiety, self-reported anxiety, and presence of anxiety disorders are associated with peer liking, and (3) whether or not self-reported anxiety and presence of anxiety disorders are associated with peer liking after controlling for peer-reported anxiety. Peer raters (9.5-12.5 years) rated videotaped speech samples of target children with anxiety disorders (AD; 9.5-13 years) and target children without anxiety disorders (NAD; 9.5-13 years). Peer-rated anxiety was positively correlated with target children's self-reported anxiety and was higher among children with AD and children with social phobia (SP). Peer liking was inversely related to peer-reported anxiety and was lower for target children with SP. Target children with SP were liked less regardless of how anxious peers perceived them to be. Peer rater and target child demographics did not moderate the relationship between peer-rated anxiety and peer liking
PMID: 18027084
ISSN: 0091-0627
CID: 80300

Evidence-based treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a preschool-age child: a case study [Case Report]

Verduin, Timothy L; Abikoff, Howard; Kurtz, Steven M S
This case study illustrates a behavioral treatment of 'Peter,' a 4-year-old male with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder. Multiple evidence-based treatment procedures were implemented, affording the opportunity to explore issues common to the clinical application of empirically supported interventions. Among the strategies utilized were behavioral parent training, school consultation and behavioral training of educators, school-based contingency management, and a behavioral daily report card. Numerous issues are discussed, including the limited evidence regarding interventions for preschool-age children with ADHD, factors influencing treatment planning and sequencing, collaboration with schools and parents, and evidence-based assessment of treatment gains
PMID: 18470784
ISSN: 1537-4424
CID: 80613

Peer perceptions of children with anxiety disorders: An examination of peer-perceived anxiety and peer liking [Dissertation]

Verduin, Timothy L
Examined three aspects of childhood anxiety and peer liking: (1) whether or not children can detect anxiety in age mates, (2) the degree to which peer-reported anxiety, self-reported anxiety, and presence of anxiety disorders are associated with peer liking, and (3) whether or not self-reported anxiety and presence of anxiety disorders are associated with peer liking after controlling for peer-reported anxiety. Peer raters (N=20; age 9.5-12.8) watched and rated videotaped speech samples of anxiety disordered (AD; N=62; age 9.5-13.5) and non-anxiety disordered (NAD; N=18; age 9.5-13.5) target children. Peer-rated anxiety was positively correlated with target children's self-reported anxiety and was higher among AD children and among children with social phobia (SP). Peer liking was inversely related to peer-reported anxiety and was lower for target children with SP. Target children with SP were liked less regardless of how anxious peers reported them to be. Peer rater and target child demographics did not moderate the relationship between peer-rated anxiety and peer liking. Theoretical and clinical implications and suggestions for further research are discussed.
PSYCH:2007-99014-065
ISSN: 0419-4217
CID: 74627

Realists and constructionists: Can't we all just get along? [Book Review]

Verduin, Timothy L; Efran, Jay S
Reviews the book, 'Social Construction in Context,' by Kenneth J. Gergen. In this book, Gergen strives to maintain a balance between communicating his personal zeal for constructionism and overselling the product. He wants to be absolutely clear that constructionism ought not to be viewed as yet another foundational ontology vying for supremacy. Although he obviously considers constructionism a useful addition to the philosopher of science's armamentarium, he preaches a thoroughgoing pluralism, in which the role of each epistemology is to enrich, not replace, the competition. Furthermore, given that we presumably live in a process world, Gergen has no illusions that his present take on social constructionism will constitute the final word. Nevertheless, as the premier proponent of social constructionism, Gergen's latest formulations command our attention. Although Gergen still enjoys the sturm und drang of these ideological skirmishes, he concludes in this volume that the usual attack/defend volleys have outlived their usefulness. Given the increased sophistication of the field, additional critiques, by themselves, are not apt to win any new converts or blaze any new trails.
PSYCH:2004-11143-007
ISSN: 1072-0537
CID: 74628

Differential occurrence of comorbidity within childhood anxiety disorders

Verduin, Timothy L; Kendall, Philip C
Investigated differences in comorbidity in children ages 8 to 13 (N = 199) with primary diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), separation anxiety disorder (SAD), or social phobia (SP). Children with primary SAD were found to have the highest number of comorbid diagnoses. Specific phobias were more common in children with primary SAD than in those with primary SP, whereas neither group differed from children with primary GAD. Mood disorders were more common in children with GAD or SP than in children with primary SAD. Comorbid externalizing disorders, although present in 17% of the sample, were not found to vary across diagnostic groups. Functional enuresis was most common in children with primary SAD. Results are discussed with respect to diagnostic and treatment issues
PMID: 12679288
ISSN: 1537-4416
CID: 74617

Comorbidity in childhood anxiety disorders and treatment outcome

Kendall, P C; Brady, E U; Verduin, T L
OBJECTIVE: Psychiatric comorbidity is common in anxious children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome in anxious children. METHOD: Participants were 173 children between the ages of 8 and 13 years who met primary DSM-III-R/DSM-IV diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, overanxious disorder/generalized anxiety disorder, or avoidant disorder/social phobia assessed by the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children (ADIS-C). The majority (79%) had at least one comorbid diagnosis. Participants were randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral therapy or waitlist. Group differences in ADIS-C diagnoses were compared after treatment. Multiple parent and child self-report measures were used to measure symptoms as well. RESULTS: Pretreatment comorbidity was not associated with differences in treatment outcome: 68.4% of noncomorbid participants and 70.6% of comorbid participants were free of their primary diagnosis after treatment. Regarding parent and child self-report symptoms, multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant time (treatment) main effects, but no significant main effect for group (comorbid status) or time/group interaction. CONCLUSIONS: The cognitive-behavioral treatment program was similarly effective in anxious children with and without comorbid disorders; both groups showed clinically significant reductions in pretreatment diagnoses and symptoms
PMID: 11437017
ISSN: 0890-8567
CID: 74609