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The TeleHealth OSCE: Preparing Trainees to Use Telemedicine as a Tool for Transitions of Care

Sartori, Daniel J; Hayes, Rachael W; Horlick, Margaret; Adams, Jennifer G; Zabar, Sondra R
Background/UNASSIGNED:Telemedicine holds promise to bridge the transition of care between inpatient and outpatient settings. Despite this, the unique communication and technical skills required for virtual encounters are not routinely taught or practiced in graduate medical education (GME) programs. Objective/UNASSIGNED:To develop an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) case to assess residents' telemedicine-specific skills and identify potential gaps in our residency program's curriculum. Methods/UNASSIGNED:As part of a multi-station OSCE in 2019, we developed a case simulating a remote encounter between a resident and a recently discharged standardized patient. We developed an assessment tool comprising specific behaviors anchored to "not done," "partly done," and "well done" descriptors to evaluate core communication and telemedicine-specific skills. Results/UNASSIGNED:Seventy-eight NYU internal medicine residents participated in the case. Evaluations from 100% of participants were obtained. Residents performed well in Information Gathering and Relationship Development domains. A mean 95% (SD 3.3%) and 91% (SD 4.9%) of residents received "well done" evaluations across these domains. A mean 78% (SD 14%) received "well done" within Education/Counseling domain. However, only 46% (SD 45%) received "well done" evaluations within the Telemedicine domain; specific weak areas included performing a virtual physical examination (18% well done) and leveraging video to augment history gathering (17% well done). There were no differences in telemedicine-specific skill evaluations when stratified by training track or postgraduate year. Conclusions/UNASSIGNED:We simulate a post-discharge virtual encounter and present a novel assessment tool that uncovers telemedicine-specific knowledge gaps in GME trainees.
PMCID:7771608
PMID: 33391602
ISSN: 1949-8357
CID: 4738482

THE VIRTUAL OSCE: PREPARING TRAINEES TO USE TELEMEDICINE AS A TOOL FOR TRANSITIONS OF CARE [Meeting Abstract]

Sartori, Daniel; Horlick, Margaret; Hayes, Rachael; Adams, Jennifer; Zabar, Sondra R.
ISI:000567143602390
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4799312

LET'S DEBATE THE GUIDELINES! ENGAGING INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN [Meeting Abstract]

Blum, Cary J.; Hayes, Rachael W.; Adams, Jennifer
ISI:000567143602327
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4799362

ENHANCING INTERVIEW SKILLS FOR GME FACULTY [Meeting Abstract]

Hayes, Rachael W.; Blachman, Nina; Moore, Sarah J.; Sarkar, Suparna
ISI:000567143602276
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4799382

RAPID RESPONSE TEAM TO THE CLINIC BATHROOM!: CAN RESIDENTS IDENTIFY AND MANAGE OPIOID OVERDOSE? [Meeting Abstract]

Lynn, Meredith; Hayes, Rachael; Hanley, Kathleen; Zabar, Sondra R.; Calvo-Friedman, Alessandra; Wilhite, Jeffrey
ISI:000567143602366
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4800082

Development and initial evaluation of community health curriculum in an internal medicine residency program: Year one [Meeting Abstract]

Hayes, R W; Adams, J; Altshuler, L; Martin, J
Needs and Objectives: In the changing landscape of healthcare, physicians must be adaptive, visionary and evidence-based in their approach to care Medical education must be adjusted to allow learners to gain skills that prepare them to function effectively in this new paradigm. In order to meet these needs, we developed a community based curriculum with emphasis on transitions of care, population health and innovation of care. Setting and Participants: Curriculum was developed as part of a new NYU Internal Medicine Residency Community Health Track, housed at NYU Langone Hospital-Brooklyn, a community based, academic teaching hospital. Ambulatory training is based at the Family Health Centers at NYU Langone, a network of FQHCs. Both the hospital and FQHCs serve a vulnerable, diverse community in south Brooklyn. To date we have recruited one class of 10 interns. As of July 2020 we anticipate having a full track consisting of 30 residents. Description: Our first year curriculum aims to develop a framework for thinking about community health introducing key concepts such as population-based care, novel delivery of care, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Early in their training, residents completed a community assessment using observational data, interviews and census track data. These assessments paired with collaboration with CHW and community organizations gave them first hand exposure to our area's specific challenges and gaps in care. The residents began to develop skills in home care by working with an interdisciplinary team of doctors, nurses and CHWs. Additionally, they participated in a transitions of care workshop, examining their own hospital patients who had been readmitted and identifying best practices for hospital discharge. Evaluation: A multi-method evaluation plan is essential as we evaluate and strengthen the curriculum. Qualitative feedback is gathered at regular intervals throughout the year along with surveys of trainees. Initial Results suggest that curricula is well-received by residents. Aggregated longitudinal educational data including resident self-report, 360oevaluations and performance-based assessment, (OSCEs, USP visits) will contribute to program evaluation. The most important outcome will be how these trainees practice once they have graduated. We plan to use postgraduate surveys to judge the impact of the curriculum. Discussion/Reflection/Lessons Learned: We adapted curriculum to focus on our particular community and created innovative programs to improve the population's health. Essential to these accomplishments was our partnership with learners and our reliance on their feedback to guide curriculum development. Allowing trainees to explore their interests has lead to visionary projects. We have learned that by being flexible and adapting to the learners' needs and interests we can serve our community in deeper ways than we had initially anticipated. However, structural limitations of the clinic coupled with institutional changes resulted in a slower time frame for clinical adaptations
EMBASE:629002224
ISSN: 1525-1497
CID: 4053092

SUBOXONE AND ME: AN OSCE-BASED ASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL RESIDENTS' KNOWLEDGE OF MEDICAL TREATMENT OF OPIOID ADDICTION [Meeting Abstract]

Hayes, Rachael W.; Hanley, Kathleen; Calvo-Friedman, Alessandra; Adams, Jennifer; Altshuler, Lisa; Gillespie, Colleen C.; Zabar, Sondra
ISI:000442641401240
ISSN: 0884-8734
CID: 4449822