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796


Autoimmune, Autoinflammatory Disease and Cutaneous Malignancy Associations with Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A Cross-Sectional Study

Brydges, Hilliard T; Onuh, Ogechukwu C; Friedman, Rebecca; Barrett, Joy; Betensky, Rebecca A; Lu, Catherine P; Caplan, Avrom S; Alavi, Afsaneh; Chiu, Ernest S
BACKGROUND:Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a debilitating cutaneous disease characterized by severe painful inflammatory nodules/abscesses. At present, data regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of this disease are limited. OBJECTIVE:To define the prevalence and comorbidity associations of HS. METHODS:examining over 180 million US patients. Prevalences were calculated by demographic and odds ratios (OR) and identified comorbidity correlations. RESULTS:All examined metabolism-related, psychological, and autoimmune/autoinflammatory (AI) diseases correlated with HS. The strongest associations were with pyoderma gangrenosum [OR 26.56; confidence interval (CI): 24.98-28.23], Down syndrome (OR 11.31; CI 10.93-11.70), and polycystic ovarian syndrome (OR 11.24; CI 11.09-11.38). Novel AI associations were found between HS and lupus (OR 6.60; CI 6.26-6.94) and multiple sclerosis (MS; OR 2.38; CI 2.29-2.48). Cutaneous malignancies were largely not associated in the unsegmented cohort; however, among Black patients, novel associations with melanoma (OR 2.39; CI 1.86-3.08) and basal cell carcinoma (OR 2.69; CI 2.15-3.36) were identified. LIMITATIONS/CONCLUSIONS:International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-based disease identification relies on coding fidelity and diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:This is the first study to identify correlations between HS with melanoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) among Black patients as well as MS and lupus in all patients with HS.
PMID: 38337127
ISSN: 1179-1888
CID: 5632132

Iliac Crest and Distal Radius Autografts Exhibit Distinct Cell-Intrinsic Functional Differences

Mehta, Devan D; Dankert, John F; Buchalter, Daniel B; Kirby, David J; Patel, Karan S; Rocks, Madeline; Hacquebord, Jacques H; Leucht, Philipp
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE:Autologous bone grafts demonstrate osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic properties. Hand surgeons commonly augment surgical fixation with autografts to promote fracture healing. This study compared the intrinsic stem cell-like properties of 2 commonly used autograft sources in hand surgery: the iliac crest and distal radius. METHODS:A total of 9 subjects who received an iliac crest bone graft and distal radius bone graft harvest as a part of the standard care of distal radius malunion or nonunion correction or scaphoid nonunion open reduction and internal fixation were enrolled in the study. Cells were isolated by serial collagenase digestion and subjected to fibroblast colony-forming units, osteogenesis, and adipogenesis assays. The expression levels of genes involved in osteogenesis and adipogenesis were confirmed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS:The cells isolated from the iliac crest bone graft compared with those isolated from the distal radius bone graft demonstrated significantly higher mean fibroblast colony-forming unit efficiency; increased osteogenesis, as measured using alizarin red quantification; increased adipogenesis, as measured using oil red O quantification; and higher expression levels of genes involved in osteogenesis and adipogenesis under the respective differentiation conditions. CONCLUSIONS:The cells isolated from the iliac crest bone graft demonstrated a higher fibroblast colony-forming unit capacity and an increased capability to undergo both osteogenesis and adipogenesis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE/CONCLUSIONS:Limited evidence exists comparing the intrinsic stem cell-like properties of the iliac crest and distal radius despite the widespread use of each source in hand and wrist surgery. The information from this investigation may assist hand and wrist surgeons with the selection of a source of autograft.
PMID: 35933254
ISSN: 1531-6564
CID: 5288512

Ultrathin lithium disilicate and translucent zirconia crowns for posterior teeth: Survival and failure modes

Benalcazar Jalkh, Ernesto B; Ramalho, Ilana S; Bergamo, Edmara T P; Alves, Larissa M M; Tanaka, Ricardo; Witek, Lukasz; Coelho, Paulo G; Hirata, Ronaldo; Bonfante, Estevam A
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the reliability and failure modes of ultrathin (0.5 mm) lithium disilicate, translucent and ultra-translucent zirconia crowns for posterior teeth restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS/METHODS:Fifty-four mandibular first molar crowns of three ceramic materials: (1) Lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent), (2) 3Y-TZP (Zirconn Translucent, Vipi), and (3) 5Y-PSZ (Cercon XT, Dentsply Sirona), with 0.5 mm of thickness were milled and cemented onto composite resin abutments. Eighteen samples of each group were tested under mouth-motion step-stress accelerated life testing in a humid environment using mild, moderate, and aggressive profiles. Data was subjected to Weibull statistics. Use level curves were plotted and reliability was calculated for a given mission of 100,000 cycles at 100, 200, and 300 N. Fractographic analyses of representative samples were performed in scanning electron microscope. RESULTS:Beta (β) values suggest that failures were dictated by material's strength for lithium disilicate and by fatigue damage accumulation for both zirconias. No significant differences were detected in Weibull modulus and characteristic strength among groups. At a given mission of 100,000 cycles at 100 N, lithium disilicate presented higher reliability (98% CB: 95-99) regarding 3Y-TZP and 5Y-PSZ groups (84% CB: 65%-93% and 79% CB: 37&-94%, respectively). At 200 N, lithium disilicate reliability (82% CB: 66%-91%) was higher than 5Y-PSZ (20% CB: 4%-44%) and not significantly different from 3Y-TZP (54% CB: 32%-72%). Furthermore, at 300 N no significant differences in reliability were detected among groups, with a notable reduction in the reliability of all materials. Fractographic analyses showed that crack initiated at the interface between the composite core and the ceramic crowns due to tensile stress generated at the intaglio surface. CONCLUSIONS:Ultrathin lithium disilicate crowns demonstrated higher reliability relative to zirconia crowns at functional loads. Lithium disilicate and zirconia crown's reliability decreased significantly for missions at higher loads and similar failure modes were observed regardless of crown material. The indication of 0.5 mm thickness crowns in high-load bearing regions must be carefully evaluated. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE/CONCLUSIONS:Ultraconservative lithium disilicate and zirconia crowns of 0.5 mm thickness may be indicated in anterior restorations and pre-molars. Their clinical indication in high-load requirement regions must be carefully evaluated.
PMID: 37676053
ISSN: 1708-8240
CID: 5625542

Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Technology Overview Summary: Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate for Knee Osteoarthritis

Dubin, Jonathan; Leucht, Philipp; Murray, Martha; Pezold, Ryan; ,
The Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) for Knee Osteoarthritis Technology Overview is based on a systematic review of current scientific and clinical research. Through analysis of the current best evidence, this technology overview seeks to evaluate the efficacy of PRP for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The systematic literature review resulted in 54 articles: 36 high-quality and 18 moderate-quality. The findings of these studies were summarized to present findings on PRP versus control/placebo, acetaminophen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, exercise, prolotherapy, autologous conditioned serum, bone marrow aspirate concentrate, hyaluronic acid, and ozone therapy. In addition, the work group highlighted areas that needed additional research when evidence proved lacking on the topic and carefully noted the potential harms associated with an intervention, required resource utilization, acceptability, and feasibility.
PMID: 38295392
ISSN: 1940-5480
CID: 5627112

Bone Tissue Engineering (BTE) of the Craniofacial Skeleton, Part II: Translational Potential of 3D-Printed Scaffolds for Defect Repair

Slavin, Blaire V.; Nayak, Vasudev V.; Boczar, Daniel; Bergamo, Edmara T.P.; Slavin, Benjamin R.; Yarholar, Lauren M.; Torroni, Andrea; Coelho, Paulo G.; Witek, Lukasz
Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing and 3-dimensional (3D) printing techniques have revolutionized the approach to bone tissue engineering for the repair of craniomaxillofacial skeletal defects. Ample research has been performed to gain a fundamental understanding of the optimal 3D-printed scaffold design and composition to facilitate appropriate bone formation and healing. Benchtop and preclinical, small animal model testing of 3D-printed bioactive ceramic scaffolds augmented with pharmacological/biological agents have yielded promising results given their potential combined osteogenic and osteoinductive capacity. However, other factors must be evaluated before newly developed constructs may be considered analogous alternatives to the "gold standard" autologous graft for defect repair. More specifically, the 3D-printed bioactive ceramic scaffold's long-term safety profile, biocompatibility, and resorption kinetics must be studied. The ultimate goal is to successfully regenerate bone that is comparable in volume, density, histologic composition, and mechanical strength to that of native bone. In vivo studies of these newly developed bone tissue engineering in translational animal models continue to make strides toward addressing regulatory and clinically relevant topics. These include the use of skeletally immature animal models to address the challenges posed by craniomaxillofacial defect repair in pediatric patients. This manuscript reviews the most recent preclinical animal studies seeking to assess 3D-printed ceramic scaffolds for improved repair of critical-sized craniofacial bony defects.
SCOPUS:85181516357
ISSN: 1049-2275
CID: 5630232

Surgical repair of large segmental bone loss with the induced membrane technique: patient reported outcomes are comparable to nonunions without bone loss

Konda, Sanjit R; Boadi, Blake I; Leucht, Philipp; Ganta, Abhishek; Egol, Kenneth A
OBJECTIVE:To compare the outcomes of patients with segmental bone loss who underwent repair with the induced membrane technique (IMT) with a matched cohort of nonunion fractures without bone loss. DESIGN/METHODS:Retrospective analysis on prospectively collected data. SETTING/METHODS:Academic medical center. PATIENTS/METHODS:Two cohorts of patients, those with upper and lower extremity diaphyseal large segmental bone loss and those with ununited fractures, were enrolled prospectively between 2013 and 2020. Sixteen patients who underwent repair of 17 extremities with segmental diaphyseal or meta-diaphyseal bone defects treated with the induced membrane technique were identified, and matched with 17 patients who were treated for 17 fracture nonunions treated without an induced membrane. Sixteen of the bone defects treated with the induced membrane technique were due to acute bone loss, and the other was a chronic aseptic nonunion. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS/METHODS:Healing rate, time to union, functional outcome scores using the Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA) and pain assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). RESULTS:The initial average defect size for patients treated with the induced membrane technique was 8.85 cm. Mean follow-up times were similar with 17.06 ± 10.13 months for patients treated with the IMT, and 20.35 ± 16.68. months for patients treated without the technique. Complete union was achieved in 15/17 (88.2%) of segmental bone loss cases treated with the IMT and 17/17 (100%) of cases repaired without the technique at the latest follow up visit. The average time to union for patients treated with the induced membrane technique was 13.0 ± 8.4 months and 9.64 ± 4.7 months for the matched cohort. There were no significant differences in reported outcomes measured by the SMFA or VAS. Patients treated with the induced membrane technique required more revision surgeries than those not treated with an induced membrane. CONCLUSION/CONCLUSIONS:Outcomes following treatment of acute bone loss from the diaphysis of long bones with the induced membrane technique produces clinical and radiographic outcomes similar to those of long bone fracture nonunions without bone loss that go on to heal. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE/METHODS:III.
PMID: 37439888
ISSN: 1432-1068
CID: 5537692

Nav1.7 as a chondrocyte regulator and therapeutic target for osteoarthritis

Fu, Wenyu; Vasylyev, Dmytro; Bi, Yufei; Zhang, Mingshuang; Sun, Guodong; Khleborodova, Asya; Huang, Guiwu; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Renpeng; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Shujun; Cai, Xianyi; He, Wenjun; Cui, Min; Zhao, Xiangli; Hettinghouse, Aubryanna; Good, Julia; Kim, Ellen; Strauss, Eric; Leucht, Philipp; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Guo, Edward X; Samuels, Jonathan; Hu, Wenhuo; Attur, Mukundan; Waxman, Stephen G; Liu, Chuan-Ju
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease. Currently there are no effective methods that simultaneously prevent joint degeneration and reduce pain1. Although limited evidence suggests the existence of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in chondrocytes2, their expression and function in chondrocytes and in OA remain essentially unknown. Here we identify Nav1.7 as an OA-associated VGSC and demonstrate that human OA chondrocytes express functional Nav1.7 channels, with a density of 0.1 to 0.15 channels per µm2 and 350 to 525 channels per cell. Serial genetic ablation of Nav1.7 in multiple mouse models demonstrates that Nav1.7 expressed in dorsal root ganglia neurons is involved in pain, whereas Nav1.7 in chondrocytes regulates OA progression. Pharmacological blockade of Nav1.7 with selective or clinically used pan-Nav channel blockers significantly ameliorates the progression of structural joint damage, and reduces OA pain behaviour. Mechanistically, Nav1.7 blockers regulate intracellular Ca2+ signalling and the chondrocyte secretome, which in turn affects chondrocyte biology and OA progression. Identification of Nav1.7 as a novel chondrocyte-expressed, OA-associated channel uncovers a dual target for the development of disease-modifying and non-opioid pain relief treatment for OA.
PMCID:10794151
PMID: 38172636
ISSN: 1476-4687
CID: 5626502

Bone Tissue Engineering (BTE) of the Craniofacial Skeleton, Part II: Translational Potential of 3D-Printed Scaffolds for Defect Repair

Slavin, Blaire V; Nayak, Vasudev V; Boczar, Daniel; Bergamo, Edmara Tp; Slavin, Benjamin R; Yarholar, Lauren M; Torroni, Andrea; Coelho, Paulo G; Witek, Lukasz
Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing and 3-dimensional (3D) printing techniques have revolutionized the approach to bone tissue engineering for the repair of craniomaxillofacial skeletal defects. Ample research has been performed to gain a fundamental understanding of the optimal 3D-printed scaffold design and composition to facilitate appropriate bone formation and healing. Benchtop and preclinical, small animal model testing of 3D-printed bioactive ceramic scaffolds augmented with pharmacological/biological agents have yielded promising results given their potential combined osteogenic and osteoinductive capacity. However, other factors must be evaluated before newly developed constructs may be considered analogous alternatives to the "gold standard" autologous graft for defect repair. More specifically, the 3D-printed bioactive ceramic scaffold's long-term safety profile, biocompatibility, and resorption kinetics must be studied. The ultimate goal is to successfully regenerate bone that is comparable in volume, density, histologic composition, and mechanical strength to that of native bone. In vivo studies of these newly developed bone tissue engineering in translational animal models continue to make strides toward addressing regulatory and clinically relevant topics. These include the use of skeletally immature animal models to address the challenges posed by craniomaxillofacial defect repair in pediatric patients. This manuscript reviews the most recent preclinical animal studies seeking to assess 3D-printed ceramic scaffolds for improved repair of critical-sized craniofacial bony defects.
PMID: 37622526
ISSN: 1536-3732
CID: 5598722

Does Flipping from Prone to Supine for Medial Malleolar Fixation of Trimalleolar Ankle Fractures Improve Results?

Kadiyala, Manasa L; Merrell, Lauren A; Ganta, Abhishek; Konda, Sanjit R; Rivero, Steven M; Leucht, Philipp; Tejwani, Nirmal C; Egol, Kenneth A
There has been a paradigm shift towards fixing the posterior malleolus in trimalleolar ankle fractures. This study evaluated whether a surgeon's preference to intraoperatively flip or not flip patients from prone to supine for medial malleolar fixation following repair of fibular and posterior malleoli impacted surgical outcomes. A retrospective patient cohort treated at a large urban academic center and level 1 trauma center was reviewed to identify all operative trimalleolar ankle fractures initially positioned prone. One hundred and forty-seven patients with mean 12-month follow up were included and divided based on positioning for medial malleolar fixation, prone or supine (following closure, flip and re-prep and drape). Data was collected on patient demographics, injury mechanism, perioperative variables, and complication rates. Postoperative reduction films were reviewed by orthopedic traumatologists to grade the accuracy of anatomic fracture reduction. Overall, 74 (50.3%) had the medial malleolus fixed prone, while 73 (49.7%) were flipped and fixed supine. No differences in demographics, injury details, and fracture type existed between the groups. The supine group had a higher rate of initial external fixation (p=0.047), longer operative time in minutes (p<0.001), and a higher use of plate and screw constructs for medial malleolar fixation (p=0.019). There were no differences in clinical and radiographic outcomes and complication rates. This study demonstrated that intraoperative change in positioning for improved medial malleolar visualization in trimalleolar ankle fractures results in longer operative times but similar radiographic and clinical results. The decision of operative position should be based on surgeon comfort.
PMID: 38103721
ISSN: 1542-2224
CID: 5612532

3D Printing Applications for Craniomaxillofacial Reconstruction: A Sweeping Review

Slavin, Blaire V; Ehlen, Quinn T; Costello, Joseph P; Nayak, Vasudev Vivekanand; Bonfante, Estavam A; Benalcázar Jalkh, Ernesto B; Runyan, Christopher M; Witek, Lukasz; Coelho, Paulo G
The field of craniomaxillofacial (CMF) surgery is rich in pathological diversity and broad in the ages that it treats. Moreover, the CMF skeleton is a complex confluence of sensory organs and hard and soft tissue with load-bearing demands that can change within millimeters. Computer-aided design (CAD) and additive manufacturing (AM) create extraordinary opportunities to repair the infinite array of craniomaxillofacial defects that exist because of the aforementioned circumstances. 3D printed scaffolds have the potential to serve as a comparable if not superior alternative to the "gold standard" autologous graft. In vitro and in vivo studies continue to investigate the optimal 3D printed scaffold design and composition to foster bone regeneration that is suited to the unique biological and mechanical environment of each CMF defect. Furthermore, 3D printed fixation devices serve as a patient-specific alternative to those that are available off-the-shelf with an opportunity to reduce operative time and optimize fit. Similar benefits have been found to apply to 3D printed anatomical models and surgical guides for preoperative or intraoperative use. Creation and implementation of these devices requires extensive preclinical and clinical research, novel manufacturing capabilities, and strict regulatory oversight. Researchers, manufacturers, CMF surgeons, and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are working in tandem to further the development of such technology within their respective domains, all with a mutual goal to deliver safe, effective, cost-efficient, and patient-specific CMF care. This manuscript reviews FDA regulatory status, 3D printing techniques, biomaterials, and sterilization procedures suitable for 3D printed devices of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton. It also seeks to discuss recent clinical applications, economic feasibility, and future directions of this novel technology. By reviewing the current state of 3D printing in CMF surgery, we hope to gain a better understanding of its impact and in turn identify opportunities to further the development of patient-specific surgical care.
PMID: 37982644
ISSN: 2373-9878
CID: 5608172